October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is domestic violence awareness month. Violence between partners and in families occurs nationwide, with far-reaching consequences. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey,

every year, millions of women, men, and children in the United States are victimized by sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. These forms of violence are serious public health problems that can be harmful to one’s health, both physically and psychologically. Furthermore, evidence indicates that violence experienced early in life can put one at increased risk for subsequent victimization as an adult. (p. 9)

The survey indicates that intimate partner sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking has been experienced by 37.3% of women and 30.9% of men in the United States during their lifetimes (p. 2).

APA authors and editors have addressed the scope of this problem, underlying issues, interventions, and prevention in multiple books.

As the editors of Violence Against Women and Children note, “awareness of the problem is the first step toward prevention. People cannot stop something they cannot see or name” (Volume 2, p. 3). We hope these resources can be helpful to individuals or clinicians who might need them.

References

Smith, S. G., Chen, J., Basile, K. C., Gilbert, L. K., Merrick, M. T., Patel, N., Walling, M., & Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 State Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

October Releases From APA Books!

APA Handbook of the Psychology of Women 

Volume 1: History, Theory, and Battlegrounds 

Volume 2: Perspectives on Women’s Private and Public Lives 

Editors in Chief Cheryl B. Travis and Jacquelyn W. White 

Authors in this two-volume set provide scholarly reviews and in-depth analyses, with themes of status and power informing many chapters. Volume 1 describes feminist critiques of theory and addresses the uniquely intersecting components of individual experience. Volume 2 focuses on applied subjects, including psychological well-being, close relationships, victimization, and leadership. 

 

Integrative Systemic Therapy 

Metaframeworks for Problem Solving With Individuals, Couples, and Families 

William M. Pinsof, Douglas C. Breunlin, William P. Russell, Jay L. Lebow, Cheryl Rampage, and Anthony L. Chambers  

This book provides a comprehensive framework for individual, couple, and family therapy.  It also offers practical guidelines for when and how to use strategies from various therapy models and empirically supported treatments. 

 

 

 

Long-Term Outcomes of Military Service 

The Health and Well-Being of Aging Veterans 

Edited by Avron Spiro, Richard A. Settersten, Jr., and Carolyn M. Aldwin  

Contributors to this groundbreaking book examine the effects of military service across the lifespan.  Topic areas include the effects of combat and stress on longevity and brain functioning; the use of memory, cognition, and ego development at various points in life; the relationship between experiences of discrimination and the later development of PTSD; marriage longevity; employment; and the way notions of patriotism and nationalism among service personnel and their families may change over time. 

 

The Essentials of Conditioning and Learning 

FOURTH EDITION 

Michael Domjan 

Now in its fourth edition, Michael Domjan’s classic textbook presents the basic principles of learning and conditioning in a concise and accessible style, with an emphasis on the latest influential research findings and theoretical perspectives. While the field of learning and conditioning is more than a hundred years old, new discoveries continue to be made and new applications of basic research are tackling major clinical problems. Domjan summarizes these developments as well as basic learning and conditioning principles using both human and animal examples. 

 

The Ethical Practice of Consulting Psychology 

Rodney L. Lowman and Stewart E. Cooper 

This book, based on the APA Ethics Code, reviews the unique ethical issues that psychologists encounter when working as consultants in business and other organizational settings at three levels of practice: individual, group, and organizational. 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Elder Abuse 

A Clinician’s Guide 

Shelly L. Jackson  

This book helps mental health clinicians anticipate, recognize, and respond to elder abuse. The book quickly summarizes risk and protective factors, the important role of cognition and capacity, and clinicians’ legal and ethical obligations to report suspected or known elder abuse. Readers learn strategies for communicating effectively with older adults as well as working in tandem with adult protective services. Interventions targeting older adults and their caregivers are also reviewed, along with a summary of needed research. 

On Woman’s Embodied Self

Body studies is a growing area of interest to scholars in sociology, women’s studies, and other disciplines in the humanities. But although many psychological theories are relevant to this field, psychology has not yet contributed to it in a substantive way. Joan C. Chrisler and Ingrid Johnston-Robledo hope to bridge the gap with their new book, Woman’s Embodied Self: Feminist Perspectives on Identity and Image. This book discusses women’s complex relations with their bodies and how attitudes toward the body affect women’s sense of self.


The authors write:

Our goal is to define problems in embodiment, examine them through the lenses of various psychological theories (e.g., objectification theory, stigma theory, terror management theory, stereotype embodiment theory), review the research to date on these problems, and suggest ways to help women and girls to achieve a healthy embodiment.

The authors argue that the body is a text on which women’s social location is written. Many different factors limit, constrain, or undermine women’s healthy embodiment. These include sexism, stigma, gender stereotypes, consumerism, medicalization, and the pressure to have a sanitized, sexualized, youthful, thin, healthy, and attractive body. By challenging and resisting negative sociocultural messages that promote body dissatisfaction and unhealthy beauty practices, mental health professionals and lay readers alike can help women and girls achieve a positive embodied self.

 

 

Women’s Day: Be Bold for Change

International Women’s Day is March 8, and the theme of this year’s holiday is “Be Bold for Change.” The campaign challenges us to help forge a more inclusive, gender-equal world. In particular, it calls on people everywhere to help women and girls achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious bias, promote gender-balanced leadership, value women and men’s contributions equally, and create flexible inclusive cultures. womens-day-2110797_1920

Although feminism and the psychology of women began with an emphasis on White, middle-class women, they have become much broader in recent years. Increasingly, scholarly work in this area focuses on the intersection of women’s multiple social identities, including race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, nationality, socioeconomic status, religion, ability, and age.

APA Books’ Psychology of Women series is designed to support and disseminate feminist scholarship that can improve the lives of women and other disempowered groups. The series explicitly seeks to promote a more diverse feminism.

A recent volume in the series, Womanist and Mujerista Psychologies: Voices of Fire, Acts of Courage, edited by Thema Bryant-Davis and Lillian Comas-Díaz, introduces the psychologies of womanists and mujeristas—African American women and Latinas, respectively, who have a broad and inclusive approach to feminism and liberation. Although the two psychologies differ (most notably in their racial and ethnic roots and histories of activism), they share an emphasis on spirituality and connection, creativity, self-definition, resiliency, and the liberation of all oppressed peoples. The book explores the thoughts, feelings, behavior, learning, and development of African American and Latina women and girls, the risks and traumas they frequently experience, as well as the unique cultural strengths that can help promote fulfillment and empowerment.

 

Shari Miles-Cohen & Caroline Signore: On Women With Disabilities

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. In this interview, Tyler Aune, Editorial Supervisor at APA Books, spoke with Shari Miles-Cohen PhD, Senior Director of the Women’s Programs Office at the American Psychological Association, and Caroline Signore, MD, MPH, a board-certified obstetrician-gynecologist and a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).  Their book, Eliminating Inequities for Women with Disabilities: An Agenda for Health and Wellness was recently released by APA Books.   

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

 

 

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Shari E. Miles-Cohen, PhD, is Senior Director, Women’s Programs Office (WPO) at the American Psychological Association (APA).  Dr. Miles-Cohen has received funding from the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Women Health to explore the educational needs and health care needs of women with disabilities. Prior to joining APA, she served in leadership positions with university-based and independent non-profit organizations working to improve the lives of women and girls, including the African American Women’s Institute, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and the Women’s Research and Education Institute. Dr. Miles-Cohen holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a Master of Science and a Doctor of Philosophy in Personality Psychology from Howard University.

 

Caroline Signore

Caroline Signore, MD, MPH, is a board-certified obstetrician-gynecologist, and a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).  Her interest in the reproductive health care needs of women with disabilities arose in 1996, when, shortly after completing her residency training, she sustained a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury. Since then, she has delivered a number of presentations on reproductive health and wellness in women with disabilities, served as a guest reviewer for a handbook on health for women with disabilities in developing countries, and authored chapters for women’s health textbooks. From 2004 to 2009, Dr. Signore served as an Advisory Board member to an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists committee to produce resources to assist ACOG members with providing quality reproductive health care to women with disabilities.

What’s great about your book is that you don’t just describe the problem: You also lay out a very detailed agenda for reform, with specific information about what needs to change, and where. And I was really struck by how hopeful the language in that chapter is.  Did you feel hopeful all the way through this project?

Shari: I think we’re both hopeful people by nature, so that helps.  But I also think, if I can name the problem, I can solve the problem.  We may need a lot of people, we may need a lot of money, but there is a solution out there for almost everything.  And for me, the solution is trying to meld the behavioral and physical health structures to better serve women with disabilities.

Caroline: Well, sometimes I didn’t think this book would ever get finished!  But that aside, I agree with Shari, we are hopeful people, and I also believe that if you name the problem you can start to fix it.  We realistically know nothing’s going to change overnight, but there are incremental steps, and this book will serve a guide for people who may be drawn into the field, or who are already here, doing the work that needs to be done.

Shari: I feel like I learned a lot, coming to these issues from a psychologist’s background.  I have a better understanding now of physicians and what they need, and how they think, and what challenges they may have with integrated care.  Because you lose a little bit of autonomy when you start to share, and that can be challenging for people from different disciplines.  And so that was really helpful, because it’s much easier to communicate that path forward when you have a better sense of what the other people who will be part of the team are thinking.

Caroline: I have to say I came into the project not understanding what integrated care is, and Shari has been a patient teacher.  But the more I understood it, the more I thought: This makes so much sense! Why are we so siloed?  Integrated care is especially important for underserved populations, who could really use extra care and guidance.  Particularly in areas like biopsychosocial models of care that aren’t taught in medical school, that physicians may feel poorly equipped to handle on their own.  I’m hopeful that this book can educate physicians about how to provide better care to women with disabilities.

 

Shirley Chisolm, the first black female member of the U.S. congress, said that she faced more obstacles in her life because of her gender than her race. At the risk of oversimplifying a very complex issue, do you think women with disabilities face more discrimination because of their gender, or because of their disability?

Caroline: Without question, in the health care setting, especially in the reproductive health care setting, women with disabilities feel a-gendered. They feel that their caregivers don’t think of them as women.  And that’s very troubling, for them and for me.  Not only are there physical barriers to actually getting to a doctor’s office.  But to not get information, or careful, complete care [in reproductive and sexual health] because of an assumption on the part of the caregiver that’s wrong, is really galling.

Shari: It’s hard for me to separate the gender and the disability, or the gender and the race. A woman with a disability is intact, a gestalt; she is one person.  It’s all in there together, and you can’t really separate them out.  You have to work hard to separate them.  In some ways, physicians and psychologists and others are working against human nature when they a-gender a person coming into the office.

 

So it takes effort to discriminate. I never thought about it that way before.

 Shari: I think it does, yeah.  You have to work at it, right?  I think you have to work hard to see people in that way.

 

Research shows that women with disabilities who live in poverty and particularly in rural areas are at especially high risk for poor outcomes. And these are outcomes that may be difficult to change, given that many of the accommodations you describe in this book will be made to medical facilities that are far away from where they live.  What can we do for these people? 

Caroline: Telehealth is really promising.  Today you can FaceTime with most anybody, almost everybody has a smartphone now.  And even in rural areas, if you can’t physically go to the physician’s office—heck, I’d rather FaceTime with my doctor than actually have to go to his office, it’s just so much easier.  I have high hopes for the incorporation of telemedicine into care in general, and especially care for people who have

difficulty traveling—not just women with disabilities, all people with disabilities, geriatric populations; there’s a lot of care we can give without actually putting two people physically in front of each other.

Shari: Along with technology, infrastructure also has to change.  The smartphone and the monitor are important, but so are the wires and conduits running to rural communities.  So is educating doctors (and psychologists) that it’s a good thing to do, and educating patients that they can still get good care via telehealth.  But all of that’s doable, it just takes education.  We need to educate policymakers here [in Washington], and in the States, using the State Psychological Associations and State Medical Associations to get them engaged in the conversation.

 

Making people aware of the urgent challenges that this population faces, as you’ve done in this book, is obviously enormously beneficial. What are the next steps? 

Shari: We’re seeing women with disabilities across the country who are really engaged in making change.  The book can help give them have a better sense of what the entire map looks like, and how they can be most strategically engaged.  Because one of the things that Caroline and I talk a lot about is, how do you change the ways that physicians and psychologists are educated?  It’s all about teaching hours.  Well, how do you get a school to dedicate teaching hours to the issues women with disabilities face?  One way is that you change the standards: What’s gonna be on the board exam, right?  So how do you get that done?  There are all these steps.  In addition to public education efforts which bring  attention to the issue, raising visibility, there are other complementary activities, such as professional development, research, and policy efforts, which we discuss at some length in the book’s recommendations section, that together can help to bring about change.

Caroline: This is not a completely ignored issue.  But it is underrecognized.  And understudied.  It isn’t just a matter of psychological care or medical care.  It is also a matter of civil rights, and politics, and policy, and that makes it a little more complex.  We must have patience, as each person tries to get the word out.  My hope is that our work will be viewed as a standard textbook for disabilities studies.  I would love to see it in medical schools, nursing schools, psychology classes, graduate education.  The more people know about it, the more we can get done.