The Mid-Semester Blues: No Student is an Island

by Kristen Knight

This fall more than 20 million people will attend American colleges and universities, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics. They will likely experience the satisfaction of learning new things and getting to know peers, among many highlights.

But students also can face a range of challenges, from financial and academic pressure to social and emotional stresses. In fact, the American College Health Association reported in 2014 that about 44% of college students surveyed said they felt above-average stress within the last 12-month period, about 47% said their coursework had been very difficult to handle, and about 86% felt overwhelmed by their responsibilities at some point in the past year.

Even without looking at the statistics, anyone who has ever attended university or helped someone prepare for college recognizes that the beginning of the school year can be exhilarating, but stressful. I know from experience that it is easy to feel rudderless at times. In the midst of the confusion, you may not realize that you don’t have to figure it all out on your own. It’s important to remember that there are many resources to help along the way.

APA author Donald Foss has supplied one such source. After decades spent teaching and in administration at the university level, Dr. Foss took a closer look at the factors that determine success in college. His evidence-based book, Your Complete Guide to College Success: How to Study Smart, Achieve Your Goals, and Enjoy Campus Life (2013), provides students with up-to-date information and insights about how to flourish in school and post-graduation.

Dr. Foss draws on research and the knowledge of professionals in the field—including his own—to address topics across the student-life spectrum, from academic success to career interests. The Guide begins with an “orientation,” covering the basics about the book and college life in general as well as personal space and time management, and it moves on to include sections on acing academics; managing goals, attitudes, and planning; using university resources, such as tutoring and staff expertise; dealing with challenging courses; and addressing specific facets of campus and commuting life.

I wish I’d had access to this book as a new college student. About studying, for example, Dr. Foss writes, “There is no need . . . to rely on trial and error to discover what works best. I’ll provide those pointers in this chapter and the following ones. The good news is that studying smarter is much better than studying longer.” Good news, indeed.

Later on in the book, Dr. Foss tackles attitudes and emotions and how they affect college life and academics. Wisely, he notes that “academic and personal issues can lead to restless nights and worse. Even positive emotions—especially affairs of the heart—can result in loss of focus to the point that class work suffers . . . we’ll take a closer look at your feelings and attitudes, and examine how you can make them work for you, even the feelings that start off being unpleasant.”

In fact, I feel I could still benefit from the book’s advice in my life as a “grown up.” Depending on where you are along the way in your educational journey, you may find one of APA’s many other student-oriented publications just as useful.

References

American College Health Association. (2014). American College Health Association National College Health Assessment II: Reference Group Executive Summary Spring 2014. Retrieved from http://www.acha-ncha.org/docs/ACHA-NCHA-II_ReferenceGroup_ExecutiveSummary_Spring2014.pdf

Foss, D. J. (2013). Your complete guide to college success: How to study smart, achieve your goals, and enjoy campus life. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics. (2015). Fast facts: Back to school statistics. Retrieved from http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372