Open Pages: Relational-Cultural Therapy

APA Books Open Pages is an ongoing series in which we share interesting tidbits from current & upcoming books. Find the full list by browsing the Open Pages tag. APA Books will publish Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition by Judith V. Jordan, in October 2017. The following excerpt is from Chapter 7, “Summary.”

The neurobiological data strongly support the notion that we need connections to grow and thrive. In fact, new data indicate that we need connection to survive throughout our lives; we never outgrow our need for connection (Banks, 2016; Lieberman, 2013). We come into the world primed to seek mutual connection; our brains grow, and there is balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic functioning when there is sufficient early mutuality between infant and caregiver and an absence of chronic stress. However, our social conditioning with its overvaluing of separation, autonomy, and independence is at odds with our underlying biological predispositions. Herein lies a profound dilemma, as these competing tendencies produce enormous stress in all of us. Our individualistic social conditioning erodes the very community that our biology suggests we need. We are neurologically wired to connect (to thrive in relationship) but taught to stand strong alone (to be independent and autonomous). Stress is created at a chronic and undermining level when standards for maturity that cannot actually be attained with any predictability are placed on people. Thus, we are told to be strong through autonomy and separation. But in fact, “going it alone,” or being on the outside, creates pain and a sense of inadequacy. We are told not to be vulnerable, particularly if we are male; and yet every day we encounter the inevitability of our vulnerability. We see loved ones get sick or die; we watch our children suffer with illnesses that we cannot always cure. We watch parents and loved ones succumb to the indignities of older age. We hear of random acts of violence felling adolescent boys in the inner city, of children starving in Africa, of people tortured in prisons. Yet, in our effort to deny our vulnerability, we tend to locate vulnerability in chosen target groups who are then seen as “lesser than.” We marginalize and denigrate those who are seen as “weak.” We minimize the real pain of exclusion and marginalization.

RCT therapy offers a responsive relationship based on respect and dedication to facilitating movement out of isolation. In this context, people heal from chronic disconnections and begin to rework maladaptive, negative relational images, which are keeping them locked in shame and isolation. Energy is generated, feelings of worth increase, creative activity resumes, and people demonstrate enhanced clarity about their experience and about relationships. Most important, they engage in relationships that contribute to the growth of others and community is supported.

References

Banks, A. (2016). Wired to connect. New York, NY: Tarcher/Penguin.

Jordan, J. V. (2017, in press). Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lieberman, M. (2013). Social: Why our brains are wired to connect. New York, NY: Crown.

June Releases from APA Books!

Brief Dynamic Therapy 

SECOND EDITION

Hanna Levenson

In this concise volume, Hanna Levenson revisits the history, theory, and practice of brief dynamic therapy.  This integrative approach uses techniques from attachment theory, interpersonal neurobiology, affective–experiential learning, and systems orientations to help clients with dysfunctional ways of relating to others. This Revised Edition includes updated case examples, as well as new research findings—including process-outcome studies that affirm treatment effectiveness, and new research on the “reconsolidation process” that demonstrates how sudden, dramatic change happens in brief dynamic therapy.

 

 Cultural Humility

Engaging Diverse Identities in Therapy

Joshua N. Hook, Don Davis, Jesse Owen, and Cirleen DeBlaere

This book offers a clear, easily adaptable model for understanding and working with cultural differences in therapy.  The authors focus not on theoretical or clinical knowledge, but on what therapists don’t know about their clients.  They discuss how to work with cultural differences, and how to repair cultural missteps that threaten the therapeutic relationship.  Through case examples and hands-on exercises, this book demonstrates how therapists can use their limitations as opportunities to connect with clients at a deeper level.

 

 Existential–Humanistic Therapy

SECOND EDITION

Kirk J. Schneider and Orah T. Krug

Existential-humanistic therapy melds European existential philosophy with humanistic principles of psychotherapy. In this updated guide for students and clinicians, Kirk Schneider and Orah Krug explore the theory, history, research, and practice of this unique approach, including its increasingly integrative perspective. They demonstrate how existential-humanistic therapy’s emphasis on personal freedom, responsibility, and experiential reflection can help clients free themselves from self-imposed limitations and identify authentic life goals.

 

 

 Feedback-Informed Treatment in Clinical Practice

Reaching for Excellence

Edited by David S. Prescott, Cynthia L. Maeschalck, and Scott D. Miller

Feedback-informed treatment (FIT) employs practical measures that allow clinicians to continuously monitor client progress and the therapeutic alliance, and to tailor their approach to meet an individual client’s needs. This book brings together expert clinicians who have successfully integrated FIT into their own work. They teach readers how they can apply FIT to a variety of clients and treatment settings, including private practice, clinics, child and family therapy, LGBTQ counseling, the criminal justice system, and pharmacies.

 

 Narrative Processes in Emotion-Focused Therapy for Trauma

Sandra C. Paivio and Lynne E. Angus

Emotion-Focused Therapy for Trauma (EFTT) is an evidence-based, short-term individual therapy that has proven highly effective in treating clients with trauma through its emphasis on both narrative and emotion processes. Its fundamental underlying assumption is that recovery requires the client to engage emotionally with trauma memories to achieve self-understanding.  EFTT draws upon storytelling as a fundamental aspect of the human experience, permitting a healing engagement with trauma memories.  Richly illustrated with clinical examples, this book fully integrates theory, research, practice, and training.

 

 

Violent Men

An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Violence

25th Anniversary Edition

Hans Toch

This book analyzes the motives, attitudes, assumptions, and perceptions of men who are recurrently violent.  How patterned and consistent is the violence of such men?  What are the dynamics of their escalating encounters?  What personal dispositions and orientations are most apt to lead to violence?

This special 25th Anniversary Edition confronts recent debates over police violence, describes new clinical applications, and offers reflections from preeminent clinicians and scholars on the widespread impact and enduring power of Dr. Toch’s classic work.

Mindfulness Resources

Over the last few decades, the concept of mindfulness has quickly become a hot topic in mainstream Western culture. Workshops in schools and the workplace are popping up more and more to teach exercises to cultivate general wellbeing and provide stress relief.

Broadly, the APA Dictionary of Psychology, Second Edition defines mindfulness as the “awareness of one’s internal states and surroundings,” cultivated is through meditation “in which a person focuses attention on his or her breathing and thoughts, feelings, and sensations are experienced freely as they arise.”

These practices can be incorporated into clinical psychotherapy, regardless of therapeutic approach, and modified as the psychologist sees fit. Here is a selection of products from APA Books that incorporate mindfulness-based principles:

 

APA Books® 

The Art and Science of Mindfulness, Second Edition

Intention is fundamental to any project, endeavor, or journey. Related to intention is the concept of mindfulness—the awareness that arises through intentionally attending to oneself and others in an open, caring, and nonjudgmental way. Authors Shapiro and Carlson draw from Eastern wisdom and practices as well as Western psychological science to explore why mindful awareness is integral to the therapeutic healing process. This new edition integrates the latest theory and research on mindfulness, with new sections describing the neuroscience of mindfulness and mechanisms of change.

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia

This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

Therapeutic Presence

Therapeutic presence is the state of having one’s whole self in the encounter with a client by being completely in the moment on a multiplicity of levels—physically, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually. The therapeutic relationship is essential to positive outcomes of psychotherapy. In this book, Shari M. Geller and Leslie S. Greenberg argue that therapeutic presence is the fundamental underlying quality of the therapeutic relationship and, hence, effective therapy.

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement 

This book serves as a comprehensive resource on the history, theory, and practice of mindfulness in sport.  The authors present mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE), an empirically-supported, six-session program that can be adapted for specific athletic populations.  Each MSPE session includes educational, experiential, and discussion components, as well as instructions for home practice.

 

 

APA LifeTools®

25 Lessons in Mindfulness

This book presents a practical, step-by-step approach for establishing your own mindfulness practice. Brief introductory chapters explain the scientifically proven effects on health, as well as the philosophy behind this ancient practice. The remainder of the book consists of 25 experiential lessons that guide you through various meditative practices. You will learn to be mindful of your breath, sounds, sights, tastes, movements, physical sensations, thoughts, and feelings as you maintain a compassionate attitude toward yourself and others.

 

APA Videos® 

Mindfulness for Anxiety

Ronald D. Siegel works with a young man who presents with stress-related chronic neck pain. First he helps the client to see that the mind plays a critical role in his presenting problem. Next, using the therapeutic understanding that resistance to mental and physical discomfort exacerbates suffering, Dr. Siegel works to identify the physical sensations and emotions that the client is struggling to avoid. Through practicing acceptance of pain sensations, anxiety, and other emotions, the client is able to become more comfortable with these experiences as they arise, placing him on a path toward freedom from his disorder.

 

Mindfulness for Well-Being

For most people, even the ordinary demands of life can cause some feelings of unease and stress, and these stressful thoughts and feelings may result in chronic mental and physical fatigue or anxiety. Yet, the seemingly simple act of mindfulness may help reduce the impact of stress, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. In this video, Rezvan Ameli demonstrates three mindfulness exercises within a group therapy setting and also discusses the science and practice of mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness for Insomnia

In this video, Jason C. Ong works with a group of young male clients who are all suffering from various sleep issues. In this demonstration, Ong teaches behavioral strategies within a mindfulness framework to help the group learn how to cope with periods of wakefulness at night.

 

 

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement in Practice

For many athletes, engaging competitively in a physical activity while staying in the moment can be quite difficult. Mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE) is a mental training program designed to help athletes, coaches, and other performers develop a set of core skills that can facilitate peak performance and optimal experience. This approach is rooted in the practice of mindfulness and typically administered in a group format, but it can also be used with individuals.  In this video program, Dr. Keith A. Kaufman works closely with a group of university golfers who wish to improve their performance.

 

References 

VandenBos, G. R. (Ed.). (2015). APA dictionary of psychology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

May Releases from APA Books!

Toward a More Perfect Psychology 

Improving Trust, Accuracy, and Transparency in Research

Edited by Matthew C. Makel, PhD, and Jonathan A. Plucker, PhD

At its foundational level, the heart of science is that its methods allow for others to believe its results. This foundation is served by trust, accuracy, and transparency. Toward a More Perfect Psychology presents strategies to help strengthen the field by improving research quality. This includes strategies for not just maximizing the quality and impact of one’s own work, but also evaluating and responding to the research of others. Toward a More Perfect Psychology is a vital step in making psychology a stronger, more rigorous science.

 

How and Why Are Some Therapists Better Than Others?

Understanding Therapist Effects

Edited by Louis G. Castonguay and Clara E. Hill

Some therapists are more effective than others, that much is clear; why they are more effective is less clear. To answer this question, Louis Castonguay and Clara Hill compiled this comprehensive guide that brings together expert scholars and clinicians from a variety of theoretical backgrounds. They explore the empirical foundations of therapist effects as a broad concept and propose practical strategies to help mental health practitioners become more effective. Chapters also closely examine specific therapist characteristics, skills, and attitudes that are relevant to all clinical contexts, including therapeutic presence, technical interventions, cultural competence, reactions to negative emotions, and humor.

 

Practical Ethics for Psychologists 

A Positive Approach

THIRD EDITION

Samuel J. Knapp, Leon D. VandeCreek, and Randy Fingerhut

Guided by the American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct,” this book illustrates how psychologists can actualize their ethical acumen in their daily work. The authors discuss a variety of ethically tricky areas for psychologists, including patient confidentiality and inappropriate relationships, and provide risk-reduction strategies as well as a five-step decision-making model for difficult ethical quandaries. This third edition of Practical Ethics for Psychologists includes new findings on the science of morality and on working with morally diverse clients, and ethical issues regarding the use of social media and other online communications.

 

Treating Infants and Young Children Impacted by Trauma 

Interventions That Promote Healthy Development

Joy D. Osofsky, Phillip T. Stepka, and Lucy S. King

Infants and young children exposed to trauma can suffer with developmental, emotional, behavioral, and social problems across the lifespan. Continuing research dispels the myth that children simply “grow out of it,” by demonstrating how trauma impacts neurobiological development and emphasizing the need for early intervention. The authors of this book distill the literature in this concise volume that explores the effects of trauma on infants and young children along with the treatments that are best suited for addressing these effects.

March Releases from APA Books!

therapeutic presence

A Practical Guide to Cultivating Therapeutic Presence  

Shari M. Geller

Being fully present with clients can be challenging for health practitioners, given the emotional demands of their intensive work combined with any number of physical and mental distractions, which can make it difficult to establish a healing therapeutic alliance. In this practical guide, author Shari Geller translates empirical research—including neurophysiological evidence—into simple exercises that clinicians of all theoretical persuasions can use to set a pre-session foundation for presence and develop presence throughout therapy. Geller also emphasizes therapist self-care with practices that clinicians can implement in their daily lives, which ultimately translates into more effective therapy.

 

teaching statisticsActivities for Teaching Statistics and Research Methods

A Guide for Psychology Instructors

Edited by Jeffrey R. Stowell and William E. Addison

Statistics and research methods are core components of both Advanced Placement and undergraduate psychology curricula.  Yet, these courses are often challenging for many students.  This book offers original, pedagogically sound, classroom-tested activities that engage students and inspire teachers.  Each chapter contains classroom exercises that are practical and easily implemented, and help students learn core principles in ways that are fun and engaging.  Chapters illustrate basic concepts like variance and standard deviation, correlation, p-values and effect sizes, as well as teaching strategies for identifying confounding factors, recognizing bias, constructing surveys, and understanding the ethics of behavioral research.

 

CBT

Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy

SECOND EDITION

Michelle G. Craske

In this revised edition of Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy, Michelle G. Craske provides vital updated coverage of the literature that explores the theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, and empirical basis of the approach, as well as likely future developments. This essential primer to cognitive behavioral therapy, amply illustrated with case examples featuring diverse clients, is perfect for graduate students studying theories of therapy and counseling as well as for seasoned practitioners interested in better understanding this approach.

 

 

psych of juries

The Psychology of Juries

Edited by Margaret Bull Kovera

This volume summarizes what is known about the psychology of juries and makes a strong call to arms for more research. Esteemed jury scholars identify important, yet understudied, topics at the intersection of psychology and law, review what research is currently available on the topics, and then suggest new research questions that would advance the field. Furthermore, the authors evaluate the relative importance of research methods that emphasize generalizability versus tight experimental control. Collectively, the chapters present a comprehensive survey of the literature on jury behavior and decision making and offer a robust agenda to keep researchers busy in years to come.