June Releases from APA Books!

Brief Dynamic Therapy 

SECOND EDITION

Hanna Levenson

In this concise volume, Hanna Levenson revisits the history, theory, and practice of brief dynamic therapy.  This integrative approach uses techniques from attachment theory, interpersonal neurobiology, affective–experiential learning, and systems orientations to help clients with dysfunctional ways of relating to others. This Revised Edition includes updated case examples, as well as new research findings—including process-outcome studies that affirm treatment effectiveness, and new research on the “reconsolidation process” that demonstrates how sudden, dramatic change happens in brief dynamic therapy.

 

 Cultural Humility

Engaging Diverse Identities in Therapy

Joshua N. Hook, Don Davis, Jesse Owen, and Cirleen DeBlaere

This book offers a clear, easily adaptable model for understanding and working with cultural differences in therapy.  The authors focus not on theoretical or clinical knowledge, but on what therapists don’t know about their clients.  They discuss how to work with cultural differences, and how to repair cultural missteps that threaten the therapeutic relationship.  Through case examples and hands-on exercises, this book demonstrates how therapists can use their limitations as opportunities to connect with clients at a deeper level.

 

 Existential–Humanistic Therapy

SECOND EDITION

Kirk J. Schneider and Orah T. Krug

Existential-humanistic therapy melds European existential philosophy with humanistic principles of psychotherapy. In this updated guide for students and clinicians, Kirk Schneider and Orah Krug explore the theory, history, research, and practice of this unique approach, including its increasingly integrative perspective. They demonstrate how existential-humanistic therapy’s emphasis on personal freedom, responsibility, and experiential reflection can help clients free themselves from self-imposed limitations and identify authentic life goals.

 

 

 Feedback-Informed Treatment in Clinical Practice

Reaching for Excellence

Edited by David S. Prescott, Cynthia L. Maeschalck, and Scott D. Miller

Feedback-informed treatment (FIT) employs practical measures that allow clinicians to continuously monitor client progress and the therapeutic alliance, and to tailor their approach to meet an individual client’s needs. This book brings together expert clinicians who have successfully integrated FIT into their own work. They teach readers how they can apply FIT to a variety of clients and treatment settings, including private practice, clinics, child and family therapy, LGBTQ counseling, the criminal justice system, and pharmacies.

 

 Narrative Processes in Emotion-Focused Therapy for Trauma

Sandra C. Paivio and Lynne E. Angus

Emotion-Focused Therapy for Trauma (EFTT) is an evidence-based, short-term individual therapy that has proven highly effective in treating clients with trauma through its emphasis on both narrative and emotion processes. Its fundamental underlying assumption is that recovery requires the client to engage emotionally with trauma memories to achieve self-understanding.  EFTT draws upon storytelling as a fundamental aspect of the human experience, permitting a healing engagement with trauma memories.  Richly illustrated with clinical examples, this book fully integrates theory, research, practice, and training.

 

 

Violent Men

An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Violence

25th Anniversary Edition

Hans Toch

This book analyzes the motives, attitudes, assumptions, and perceptions of men who are recurrently violent.  How patterned and consistent is the violence of such men?  What are the dynamics of their escalating encounters?  What personal dispositions and orientations are most apt to lead to violence?

This special 25th Anniversary Edition confronts recent debates over police violence, describes new clinical applications, and offers reflections from preeminent clinicians and scholars on the widespread impact and enduring power of Dr. Toch’s classic work.

What is Telemental Health?

shh_headshot-smallBy Susan Herman

Telemental health (TMH) is the use of telecommunication technologies to provide behavioral health services such as assessment, education, treatment, counseling and consultation. It refers both to live, real-time interactions as well as data sharing via asynchronous communication.

Over the phone and video teleconferencing systems, clinicians can provide care for most, if not all, the same conditions they treat in the office. Having a distance care option can increase access and decrease costs for consumers. However, telemental health can present certain logistical and safety complications. According to David Luxton, Eve-Lynn Nelson, and Marlene Maheu in their new book A Practitioner’s Guide to Telemental Health, complications can arise in regard to:

  • establishing informed consent
  • adapting intake and assessment protocols for the long-distance environment
  • involving emergency or support services, if necessary, at the client’s location
  • handling emotionally charged conversations when the client can easily power off their device, or when there might be another person in the room out of the clinician’s view

Asynchronous communication in TMH can include messaging technologies such as text or email—say, to ask follow-up questions or to check in on how well a patient is following a prescribed routine.

Software, apps, and peripheral devices for self-care and remote monitoring are also proliferating in the marketplace. These tools are broadly referred to as eHealth, or mHealth when deployed via mobile devices such as cell phones or wearables. They can be useful adjuncts to care, but cannot be used to diagnose mental health problems.

telemental-healthSome eHealth technologies provide alerts to prompt care providers to check in, similar to blood glucose monitoring systems for diabetics. According to the National Institutes of Mental Health (2016), “Such apps might use the device’s built-in sensors to collect information on a user’s typical behavior patterns. If the app detects a change in behavior, it may provide a signal that help is needed before a crisis occurs.”

Apps and wearable devices may include various coaching functions, self-monitoring, journaling, and/or stimuli (music, imagery) for help with:

  • Anxiety and stress management
  • Breathing and heart rate
  • Challenging thoughts
  • Recording moods
  • Activity, sleep, food intake
  • Meditation and mindfulness

Though it can be difficult to keep pace with innovation, providers and consumers alike should evaluate all telemental health tools carefully to make sure their data stays secure, and that actually using the technology doesn’t introduce more complications.

For a complete list of practice and ethical standards and guidelines in telehealth, including information on provider reimbursement for TMH and legal/policy issues, click here.

References

Luxton, D. D., Nelson, E., & Maheu, M. M. (2016). A Practitioner’s Guide to Telemental Health: How to Conduct Legal, Ethical, and Evidence-Based Telepractice. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

National Institutes of Mental Health (2016). Technology and the Future of Mental Health Treatment. Retrieved September 30, 2016 from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/technology-and-the-future-of-mental-health-treatment/index.shtml