Open Pages: Relational-Cultural Therapy

APA Books Open Pages is an ongoing series in which we share interesting tidbits from current & upcoming books. Find the full list by browsing the Open Pages tag. APA Books will publish Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition by Judith V. Jordan, in October 2017. The following excerpt is from Chapter 7, “Summary.”

The neurobiological data strongly support the notion that we need connections to grow and thrive. In fact, new data indicate that we need connection to survive throughout our lives; we never outgrow our need for connection (Banks, 2016; Lieberman, 2013). We come into the world primed to seek mutual connection; our brains grow, and there is balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic functioning when there is sufficient early mutuality between infant and caregiver and an absence of chronic stress. However, our social conditioning with its overvaluing of separation, autonomy, and independence is at odds with our underlying biological predispositions. Herein lies a profound dilemma, as these competing tendencies produce enormous stress in all of us. Our individualistic social conditioning erodes the very community that our biology suggests we need. We are neurologically wired to connect (to thrive in relationship) but taught to stand strong alone (to be independent and autonomous). Stress is created at a chronic and undermining level when standards for maturity that cannot actually be attained with any predictability are placed on people. Thus, we are told to be strong through autonomy and separation. But in fact, “going it alone,” or being on the outside, creates pain and a sense of inadequacy. We are told not to be vulnerable, particularly if we are male; and yet every day we encounter the inevitability of our vulnerability. We see loved ones get sick or die; we watch our children suffer with illnesses that we cannot always cure. We watch parents and loved ones succumb to the indignities of older age. We hear of random acts of violence felling adolescent boys in the inner city, of children starving in Africa, of people tortured in prisons. Yet, in our effort to deny our vulnerability, we tend to locate vulnerability in chosen target groups who are then seen as “lesser than.” We marginalize and denigrate those who are seen as “weak.” We minimize the real pain of exclusion and marginalization.

RCT therapy offers a responsive relationship based on respect and dedication to facilitating movement out of isolation. In this context, people heal from chronic disconnections and begin to rework maladaptive, negative relational images, which are keeping them locked in shame and isolation. Energy is generated, feelings of worth increase, creative activity resumes, and people demonstrate enhanced clarity about their experience and about relationships. Most important, they engage in relationships that contribute to the growth of others and community is supported.

References

Banks, A. (2016). Wired to connect. New York, NY: Tarcher/Penguin.

Jordan, J. V. (2017, in press). Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lieberman, M. (2013). Social: Why our brains are wired to connect. New York, NY: Crown.

December Releases from APA Books!

entrenchment Entrenchment and the Psychology of Language Learning 

How We Reorganize and Adapt Linguistic Knowledge

Edited by Hans-Jörg Schmid

Copublished with De Gruyter Mouton

This volume enlists more than two dozen experts in the fields of linguistics, psycholinguistics, neurology, and cognitive psychology to investigate the concept of entrenchment—the ongoing reorganization and adaptation of communicative knowledge.  Entrenchment posits that our linguistic knowledge is continuously refreshed and reorganized under the influence of social interactions.  Contributors examine the psychological foundations of linguistic entrenchment processes, and the role of entrenchment in first-language acquisition, second language learning, and language attrition. Critical views of entrenchment and some of its premises and implications are discussed from the perspective of dynamic complexity theory and radical embodied cognitive science.

 

geropsych Ethical Practice in Geropsychology

Principles, Procedures, and Practices

by Shane S. Bush, Victor A. Molinari, and Rebecca S. Allen

Psychologists who work with older adults find themselves encountering a number of novel issues. Determining a client’s decision-making capacity, balancing a client’s autonomy with his or her well-being, and juggling differing priorities from various parties—the clients, their families, other healthcare professionals, etc.—give rise to a number of complicated ethical and legal quandaries. The easy-to-follow decision-making model provided in this book will help clinicians make the most ethically sound decisions possible in these challenging situations. Clinical vignettes illustrate how to handle ethical and legal issues in a variety of contexts.

 

integrated-behavioral Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care

Step-By-Step Guidance for Assessment and Intervention

SECTOND EDITION

by Christopher L. Hunter, Jeffery L. Goodie, Mark S. Oordt, and Anne C. Dobmeyer

This timely new edition of Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care brings the reader up to speed with the changing aspects of primary care service delivery in response to the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), the Triple-Aim health approach, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Drawing on research evidence and years of experience, the authors provide practical information and guidance for behavioral health care practitioners who wish to work more effectively in the fast-paced setting of primary care, and provide detailed advice for addressing common health problems such as generalized anxiety disorder, depression, weight issues, sleep problems, cardiovascular disorders, pain disorders, sexual problems, and more.  New to this edition are chapters on population health and the PCMH; children, adolescents, and parenting; couples; managing suicide risk; and shared medical appointments.

 

starting-career Starting Your Career in Academic Psychology

by Robert J. Sternberg

This book provides a systematic guide for jump-starting a career in academic psychology—from applying and interviewing for academic positions, to settling in at a new job, to maximizing success during the pre-tenure years. The chapters cover all key skills in which new faculty must become proficient: teaching, conducting and funding faculty-level research, serving the department and field, and “softer” activities such as networking and navigating university politics. Given the demands and competition in the field, this guide is an essential roadmap for new faculty.

 

 

supervision-aedp Supervision Essentials for Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy

by Natasha Prenn and Diana Fosha

Utilizing insights from attachment theory and research in neuroplasticity, Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) clinicians help clients unearth, explore and process core feelings in order to transform anxiety and defensiveness into long-lasting, positive change.  In this book, AEDP founders and leaders Natasha C. N. Prenn and Diana Fosha offer a model of clinical supervision that is based on the AEDP approach.  Using close observation of videotaped sessions, AEDP supervisors model a strong focus on here-and-now interactions, with a full awareness of affective resonance, empathy, and dyadic affect regulation phenomena.  The goal is to offer trainees a visceral, transformative experience that complements their growing intellectual understanding of how change occurs in AEDP.