November Releases From APA Books!

Making Research Matter 

A Psychologist’s Guide to Public Engagement 

Edited by Linda R. Tropp 

This volume shows researchers how to bring their scholarship to a broader audience.  Contributors explain how to talk to the media, testify as an expert witness, approach governmental organizations, work with schools and students, and influence public policy. 

 

 

 

 

Managing Your Research Data and Documentation 

Kathy R. Berenson 

 

This book presents a straightforward approach to managing and documenting one’s data with enough clarity and precision that other researchers can fully replicate the study. Step by step, readers learn to label and archive different kinds of project documents and data files, including original, processed, and working data. The result is a logical, comprehensive approach for making one’s research transparent and replicable—a vital skill for one’s career in psychology and other behavioral sciences. 

 

 

Relational–Cultural Therapy 

SECOND EDITION 

Judith V. Jordan 

 

In this second edition of Relational–Cultural Therapy (RCT), Judith V. Jordan explores the history, theory, and practice of relationship centered, culturally oriented psychotherapy. Since the first edition, RCT has been widely embraced, with new research and applications, including developing curricula in social science graduate programs, providing a theoretical frame for an E.U.-sponsored symposiums, and enhancing team-building in workplaces. 

 


When Parents Are Incarcerated 

Interdisciplinary Research and Interventions to Support Children 

Edited by Christopher Wildeman, Anna R. Haskins, and Julie Poehlmann-Tynan 

In this volume, prominent scholars across multiple disciplines examine how parental incarceration affects children and what can be done to help them. Sociologists, demographers, developmental psychologists, family scientists, and criminologists summarize the strongest research on the consequences of parental incarceration for children, with special attention to mediating and moderating variables. Scholars review policies and interventions that could lessen the likelihood of parental incarceration and/or help children whose parents have been imprisoned or jailed. 

Open Pages: Relational-Cultural Therapy

APA Books Open Pages is an ongoing series in which we share interesting tidbits from current & upcoming books. Find the full list by browsing the Open Pages tag. APA Books will publish Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition by Judith V. Jordan, in October 2017. The following excerpt is from Chapter 7, “Summary.”

The neurobiological data strongly support the notion that we need connections to grow and thrive. In fact, new data indicate that we need connection to survive throughout our lives; we never outgrow our need for connection (Banks, 2016; Lieberman, 2013). We come into the world primed to seek mutual connection; our brains grow, and there is balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic functioning when there is sufficient early mutuality between infant and caregiver and an absence of chronic stress. However, our social conditioning with its overvaluing of separation, autonomy, and independence is at odds with our underlying biological predispositions. Herein lies a profound dilemma, as these competing tendencies produce enormous stress in all of us. Our individualistic social conditioning erodes the very community that our biology suggests we need. We are neurologically wired to connect (to thrive in relationship) but taught to stand strong alone (to be independent and autonomous). Stress is created at a chronic and undermining level when standards for maturity that cannot actually be attained with any predictability are placed on people. Thus, we are told to be strong through autonomy and separation. But in fact, “going it alone,” or being on the outside, creates pain and a sense of inadequacy. We are told not to be vulnerable, particularly if we are male; and yet every day we encounter the inevitability of our vulnerability. We see loved ones get sick or die; we watch our children suffer with illnesses that we cannot always cure. We watch parents and loved ones succumb to the indignities of older age. We hear of random acts of violence felling adolescent boys in the inner city, of children starving in Africa, of people tortured in prisons. Yet, in our effort to deny our vulnerability, we tend to locate vulnerability in chosen target groups who are then seen as “lesser than.” We marginalize and denigrate those who are seen as “weak.” We minimize the real pain of exclusion and marginalization.

RCT therapy offers a responsive relationship based on respect and dedication to facilitating movement out of isolation. In this context, people heal from chronic disconnections and begin to rework maladaptive, negative relational images, which are keeping them locked in shame and isolation. Energy is generated, feelings of worth increase, creative activity resumes, and people demonstrate enhanced clarity about their experience and about relationships. Most important, they engage in relationships that contribute to the growth of others and community is supported.

References

Banks, A. (2016). Wired to connect. New York, NY: Tarcher/Penguin.

Jordan, J. V. (2017, in press). Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lieberman, M. (2013). Social: Why our brains are wired to connect. New York, NY: Crown.

October Releases From APA Books!

language-autismInnovative Investigations of Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Edited by Letitia R. Naigles

In recent decades, a growing number of children have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition characterized by, among other features, social interaction deficits and language impairment. Yet the precise nature of the disorder’s impact on language development is not well understood, in part because of the language variability among children across the autism spectrum. The contributors to this volume—experts in fields ranging from communication disorders to developmental and clinical psychology to linguistics—use innovative techniques to address two broad questions: Is the variability of language development and use in children with ASD a function of the language, such that some linguistic domains are more vulnerable to ASD than others? Or is the variability a function of the individual, such that some characteristics predispose those with ASD to have varying levels of difficulty with language development and use?

 

supervision-emotion-focusedSupervision Essentials for Emotion-Focused Therapy

by Leslie S. Greenberg and Liliana Ramona Tomescu

The authors introduce a model of supervision that is founded on the fundamental principles of emotion-focused therapy (EFT): a safe supervisory alliance and relationship, an agreed-upon focus for each supervision session, and the identification of appropriate task markers (moments of uncertainty that present opportunities for supervisory intervention). Together, EFT supervisors and supervisees carefully deconstruct recorded therapy sessions, with moment-by-moment processing of the supervisee’s responses and emotional understanding.  Through close observation, supervisors enable trainees to develop seeing, listening, and empathic skills, as they become more attuned to both verbal and non-verbal cues that indicate clients’ emotional responses.

 

 

supervision-integrativeSupervision Essentials for Integrative Psychotherapy

by John C. Norcross and Leah M. Popple

This book presents integrative supervision applicable to integrative and single-system psychotherapy alike. Distinctive features include its synthesis of supervisory methods aligned with multiple theoretical traditions, a research-informed fit of supervision to the individuality of the supervisee, its insistence on frequent feedback from both clients and trainees, and a modeling of the philosophical pluralism and pragmatic flexibility of integration itself. In reviewing videotaped therapy sessions, integrative supervisors offer key insights into common problems, demonstrate how to adjust treatment to clients’ transdiagnostic needs, and guide trainees to clinical competence.

 

  

trauma-meaning-spiritualityTrauma, Meaning, and Spirituality

Translating Research into Clinical Practice

by Crystal L. Park, Joseph M. Currier, J. Irene Harris, and Jeanne M. Slattery

Trauma represents a spiritual or religious violation for many people. Survivors attempt to make sense out of painful events, incorporating that meaning into their current worldview in either a harmful or a more helpful way. This volume helps mental health practitioners—many of whom are less religious than their clients—understand the important relationship between trauma and spirituality, and how to best help survivors create meaning out of their experiences.  Drawing on relevant theories and research, the authors present a new conceptual framework, the Reciprocal Meaning-Making Model, demonstrating how it can guide both assessment and treatment. Through the use of case material, the authors examine a range of spiritual views, traumas, and posttraumatic reactions that are reflective of the population as a whole rather than targeting only specific religions or cultural perspectives.   Given the lack of scientific literature on the topic, this book fills an important gap, and will appeal to clinicians and researchers alike.