November Releases From APA Books!

emotion-focusedEmotion-Focused Therapy, Revised Edition 

by Leslie S. Greenberg

 

In this book, Leslie S. Greenberg presents and explores this versatile and useful approach, its theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, the empirical basis for its effectiveness, and recent developments that have refined the theory and expanded how it may be practiced. This revised edition describes recent research findings on important constructs such as emotional needs, and new developments in the use of EFT in treating anxiety disorders.

 

 

 

language-acquisitionResearch Methods in Language Acquisition

Principles, Procedures, and Practices

by María Blume and Barbara C. Lust

Copublished with De Gruyter Mouton

 

Synthesizing decades of collective experience into a set of practical guidelines for students and budding researchers, the authors of this book introduce a systematic approach to generating, processing, and interpreting reliable and valid speech data. They review a variety of observational and experimental tasks that allow researchers to collect natural speech, elicit specific types of speech, and assess language comprehension. Guidelines for generating data sets by transcribing and coding raw speech data are also reviewed, as are special considerations for working with infants and multilingual children.

 

long-term-careTransforming Long-Term Care

Expanded Roles for Mental Health Professionals

by Kelly O’Shea Carney and Margaret P. Norris

 

Every long-term care setting has the potential to foster healthier and happier lives for the older adults who reside there. Mental health practitioners are uniquely positioned to serve as critical change agents in these communities. This book shows how mental health practitioners can use their full range of skills to create systems that are more supportive and engaging for residents, while also providing the staff with greater opportunities for professional growth and meaning. To illustrate what is possible, the authors explore an innovative practice model that incorporates consultation, training, and interdisciplinary team leadership, in addition to traditional direct care services, to enhance the wellbeing of older adult residents.  Readers will also find practical information about Medicare and reimbursement for direct mental health services.

 

psych-majorsWhat Psychology Majors Could (and Should) Be Doing

An Informal Guide to Research Experience and Professional Skills

SECOND EDITION

by Paul J. Silvia, Peter F. Delaney, and Stuart Marcovitch

 

More students are majoring in psychology than ever before so competition for grad-school spots and good jobs is fierce. What are you doing to stand out from the other hundreds of thousands of psychology majors? Written in a lighthearted and humorous tone, this book shows both grad-school bound and career-bound students how to seek out and make the most of these opportunities. By getting out of the classroom and actively participating in the real world of psychology, students can build skills that will prepare them for the competitive realms of graduate school and the workforce.

October Releases From APA Books!

language-autismInnovative Investigations of Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Edited by Letitia R. Naigles

In recent decades, a growing number of children have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition characterized by, among other features, social interaction deficits and language impairment. Yet the precise nature of the disorder’s impact on language development is not well understood, in part because of the language variability among children across the autism spectrum. The contributors to this volume—experts in fields ranging from communication disorders to developmental and clinical psychology to linguistics—use innovative techniques to address two broad questions: Is the variability of language development and use in children with ASD a function of the language, such that some linguistic domains are more vulnerable to ASD than others? Or is the variability a function of the individual, such that some characteristics predispose those with ASD to have varying levels of difficulty with language development and use?

 

supervision-emotion-focusedSupervision Essentials for Emotion-Focused Therapy

by Leslie S. Greenberg and Liliana Ramona Tomescu

The authors introduce a model of supervision that is founded on the fundamental principles of emotion-focused therapy (EFT): a safe supervisory alliance and relationship, an agreed-upon focus for each supervision session, and the identification of appropriate task markers (moments of uncertainty that present opportunities for supervisory intervention). Together, EFT supervisors and supervisees carefully deconstruct recorded therapy sessions, with moment-by-moment processing of the supervisee’s responses and emotional understanding.  Through close observation, supervisors enable trainees to develop seeing, listening, and empathic skills, as they become more attuned to both verbal and non-verbal cues that indicate clients’ emotional responses.

 

 

supervision-integrativeSupervision Essentials for Integrative Psychotherapy

by John C. Norcross and Leah M. Popple

This book presents integrative supervision applicable to integrative and single-system psychotherapy alike. Distinctive features include its synthesis of supervisory methods aligned with multiple theoretical traditions, a research-informed fit of supervision to the individuality of the supervisee, its insistence on frequent feedback from both clients and trainees, and a modeling of the philosophical pluralism and pragmatic flexibility of integration itself. In reviewing videotaped therapy sessions, integrative supervisors offer key insights into common problems, demonstrate how to adjust treatment to clients’ transdiagnostic needs, and guide trainees to clinical competence.

 

  

trauma-meaning-spiritualityTrauma, Meaning, and Spirituality

Translating Research into Clinical Practice

by Crystal L. Park, Joseph M. Currier, J. Irene Harris, and Jeanne M. Slattery

Trauma represents a spiritual or religious violation for many people. Survivors attempt to make sense out of painful events, incorporating that meaning into their current worldview in either a harmful or a more helpful way. This volume helps mental health practitioners—many of whom are less religious than their clients—understand the important relationship between trauma and spirituality, and how to best help survivors create meaning out of their experiences.  Drawing on relevant theories and research, the authors present a new conceptual framework, the Reciprocal Meaning-Making Model, demonstrating how it can guide both assessment and treatment. Through the use of case material, the authors examine a range of spiritual views, traumas, and posttraumatic reactions that are reflective of the population as a whole rather than targeting only specific religions or cultural perspectives.   Given the lack of scientific literature on the topic, this book fills an important gap, and will appeal to clinicians and researchers alike.

August Releases from APA Books!

 

affirmative counselingAffirmative Counseling and Psychological Practice With Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients

Edited by Anneliese A. Singh and lore m. dickey

Fewer than 30% of psychologists report familiarity with transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) clients’ needs, which indicates a large gap in knowledge, skill, and competence in this area of practice. This timely volume provides mental health practitioners with theory-driven strategies for affirmative practice with TGNC clients of different ages, ethnicities, sexual orientations, and religious backgrounds. Affirmative care entails a collaborative, client-guided partnership in which clinicians advocate for the client’s needs. Chapters cover an array of complex issues, including ethical and legal concerns, working with trauma survivors, and interdisciplinary care.

 

Conducting a Culturally Informed Neuropsychological Evaluationneuropsych assessment

by Daryl Fujii

When conducting a neuropsychological evaluation, the clinician must develop a contextual knowledge base to fully understand a client’s current functioning. Doing so can be especially challenging when the client’s cultural background differs from that of the evaluator. This book helps neuropsychologists enhance their cultural competency, avoid biased assessments, and optimize outcomes for culturally different clients. The author describes strategies for improving communication, selecting valid tests, interpreting results, estimating premorbid functioning, working with translators, and making effective treatment recommendations.

 

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomniainsomnia

by Jason C. Ong

Insomnia is a pervasive issue for many adults that is difficult to remedy with existing treatments. This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

 

 

psych 101 half Psychology 101½

The Unspoken Rules for Success in Academia, SECOND EDITION

by Robert J. Sternberg

In this second edition of his popular Psychology 101½, eminent psychologist Robert J. Sternberg updates and extends a trove of wisdom gleaned from decades of experience in various academic settings and leadership positions. In his signature straightforward, intellectually honest, and pragmatic style, he imparts life lessons for building a successful and gratifying career. This revision features lessons in five basic categories: identity and integrity, interpersonal relationships, institutions and academia, problems and tasks, and job and career. Recent developments in the field are covered, and new questions at the end of each lesson prompt reader self-reflection. Valuable to academic psychologists at any level, this book will be especially prized by graduate students, post-doctorates, and early-career professors.

 

young eyewitnessThe Young Eyewitness

How Well Do Children and Adolescents Describe and Identify Perpetrators?

by Joanna Pozzulo

This book summarizes the research on how well children can describe an event and perpetrator (which is a recall task) and how well they can identify the perpetrator in person or in photographs (which is a recognition task). Joanna Pozzulo shows that although children may be less advanced in these skills than adults, they nonetheless can provide invaluable evidence. She interprets the research in light of developmental theories and notes practical implications for forensic investigations. In particular, the chapters highlight interviewing techniques to facilitate accurate recall and lineup techniques to facilitate accurate recognition. This book is an essential resource for all forensic investigators.

 

transcendent mindTranscendent Mind

Rethinking the Science of Consciousness                         

by Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge

Everyone knows that consciousness resides in the brain. Or does it? In this book, Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge utilize findings from quantum mechanics, special relativity, philosophy, and paranormal psychology to build a rigorous, scientific investigation into the origins and nature of human consciousness. Along the way, they examine the scientific literature on concepts such as mediumship, out-of-body and near-death experiences, telekinesis, “apparent” vs. “deep time,” and mind-to-mind communication, and introduce eye-opening ideas about our shared reality. The result is a revelatory tour of the “post-materialist” world—and a roadmap for consciousness research in the twenty-first century.

 

April Releases from APA Books!

college dictionaryAPA College Dictionary of Psychology

SECOND EDITION

Editor-in-Chief Gary R. VandenBos

 

The APA College Dictionary of Psychology, Second Edition, is a reliable resource that answers the needs of both advanced placement high-school students and college undergraduates—whether they are taking psychology as part of a broader curriculum or making it their major field of study.

 

 

 

child maltreatmentChild Maltreatment 

A Developmental Psychopathology Approach

by Kathryn A. Becker-Blease and Patricia K. Kerig

 

This book explains the science of developmental psychopathology for clinicians and other professionals who work with at-risk children. The authors focus particularly on how maltreatment differentially affects children at key stages of their lives, from infancy to early adulthood.  Armed with this understanding, clinicians can be aware of age-specific vulnerabilities and better tailor their interventions.

 

 

empowered learningEmpowered Learning in Secondary Schools

Promoting Positive Youth Development Through a Multitiered System of Supports

by Cynthia E. Hazel

 

Positive youth development (PYD) is a strengths-based, positive psychology approach to fostering adolescents’ educational engagement and achievement. It focuses not just on students’ academic development but also on their vocational, social, and emotional development. The PYD philosophy is at the heart of Cynthia Hazel’s unique model of secondary school change, which is presented in this book.

 

 

critical eventsSupervision Essentials for the Critical Events in Psychotherapy Supervision Model

by Nicholas Ladany, Myrna L. Friedlander, and Mary Lee Nelson

 

Many supervisors need help navigating the most challenging dilemmas and conflicts that arise in supervision of trainees, addressing skill deficits and competency concerns, working through role conflicts, and gender or ethnicity-related misunderstandings. Because these interpersonal conflicts can be so challenging, however, they often represent a golden opportunity for real progress.  This book presents a process model with specific strategies that together enable supervisors and trainees to successfully resolve the problem at hand and achieve lasting success in their careers.

Watching Psychotherapy

by Ed Meidenbauer

Two people talking: picture this activity, and you will easily come up with an image of psychotherapy. Conversation between two people is a basic human activity. Psychotherapy, to the casual observer, looks like two people talking.  It’s been nicknamed “talk therapy” with good reason, but is talk all there is to it?

Whether or not they have actually been to a therapist, most people have a mental image of psychotherapy due in large part to its portrayal in movies and TV shows. Examples of therapy in popular media tend to heighten the drama of therapy for the sake of the plot. This may be done by stressing the personal dilemmas of the therapists themselves or by featuring clients with extraordinarily memorable presenting problems. Is this truly what psychotherapy is about?

APA Books publishes therapy demonstrations on video—hundreds of hours of demonstrations that are used for training mental health professionals. After watching a number of these (or all of them, as I have), a broad overarching pattern emerges that, on the surface, seems simple but, in actuality, is quite profound. Most of these demonstrations show two people talking and include some fairly typical social questions (“How was your week?” “How are things going at work?” “So, can you tell me more about this project you are so excited about?”). These seem like parts of conversation you might hear every day until you realize that all of the questions are coming from one person 99% of the time, the therapist. Even when the therapist is not asking questions, his or her comments or statements always directly apply to the client. This is a major distinguishing feature of the psychotherapy interaction: The client is doing most of the talking, all of it is about him or herself, usually with hardly a question for the therapist. The strangely imbalanced way these two people are talking is at the core of psychotherapy. In no other type of relationship is one person attending another so closely, so consistently, and for such a length of time.

Watching psychotherapy 2

A scene from a psychotherapy training video featuring Dr. Candice M. Monson and a client (portrayed by an actor).

Being listened to, and more important, feeling listened to, is a great experience, one that we can usually only expect regularly from significant others. In the non-therapeutic relationships we have–whether with a spouse, a best friend, girlfriend, or boyfriend–there is hopefully some give and take. Each person in a relationship has to do some of the listening sometimes and show caring and support to the other. In psychotherapy, such mutuality is not expected, and is even—by design—discouraged. The therapist generally maintains strict boundaries, and the psychotherapy relationship is built for the client’s benefit.

If this one-sided listening were the only feature of a psychotherapy interaction that made it differ from your average conversation, it would be unusual enough and would alone have a powerful effect on the client. But behind this one-sided interaction there is something else going on. Psychotherapists are educated in the intricacies of human relationships, the way the mind works, and how emotion, behavior, and general stressors of life can tangle up a person’s thinking. They have also been educated and trained to use a host of solutions to help the client. To the observer, these solutions may look simple—a question posed at just the right time, or a suggestion to try doing something differently—but they are usually the result of much training and research.

How do therapists learn to do this? It comes not just from years of study—learning the theories and interventions involved in psychotherapy—but also from hours of observing therapy before actually sitting down to talk with a client. In past years, student therapists would sit in on therapy sessions to learn how it is done. This is tricky: The dynamics of the delicate interactions I am describing would be affected by someone silently observing. However, over the past several decades, another way to watch and learn therapy has developed: Watching psychotherapy demonstration videos.

The APA Psychotherapy Video Series has more than 200 DVDs, and PsycTHERAPY® , a database product available for streaming, holds 400 psychotherapy training videos. Whereas the video series is available title-by-title and is ideal for individual training, PsycTHERAPY® is a subscription database, accessible through the APA PsycNET® platform.  It was developed to allow clinical students and faculty to observe how therapists use different approaches and techniques and to share clips of therapeutic interactions with one another.

To help students get the most from PsycTHERAPY, all subscribers are given access to a free book, The PsycTHERAPY® Teaching Guide, that features different ways to use the videos in everything from courses on psychopathology or personality theories to providing empathy training to teaching researchers to code psychotherapy sessions. Faculty at institutions with access to PsycTHERAPY® can download the book from the PsycTHERAPY® landing page. In January 2016, in addition to getting the download, faculty can also request a print version of the book, available for free to faculty at subscribing institutions; otherwise, available for sale.

Psychotherapy can be seen as a unique type of conversation between two people. APA Books produces videos and books to aid psychotherapists as they continue to have these healing interactions, so that they may help people lead happier, healthier lives.