August Releases From APA Books!

APA Handbook of Giftedness and Talent

Edited by Steven I. Pfeiffer

The APA Handbook of Giftedness and Talent incorporates the most recent thinking and cutting-edge research from numerous fields related to gifted education, including developmental and social psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, and education. It consists of six sections: history and global perspectives; theories and conceptions of giftedness and talent development; gifted identification and assessment; gifted education; psychological considerations in understanding the gifted (e.g., family, friendships, emotional considerations); and special issues facing the gifted (e.g., policy and legal issues, perfectionism, bullying).

 

A Telepsychology Casebook

Using Technology Ethically and Effectively in Your Professional Practice

Edited by Linda F. Campbell, PhD, Fred Millán, and Jana N. Martin

This casebook provides practical recommendations on a range of issues associated with electronic-based mental health care. From technologies as simple as the telephone to more advanced webcams and mobile device applications, psychologists are increasingly using technology in their work—a practice known as telepsychology. The book’s recommendations draw from the Guidelines for the Practice of Telepsychology, which were created jointly by the American Psychological Association, the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards, and the American Insurance Trust. Each chapter presents a guideline, explains how it relates to professional ethics and standards of care, and applies it to case examples.

 

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement

Mental Training for Athletes and Coaches

By Keith A. Kaufman, Carol R. Glass, and Timothy R. Pineau

This book serves as a comprehensive resource on the history, theory, and practice of mindfulness in sport. The authors present mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE), an empirically-supported, six-session program that can be adapted for specific athletic populations.  Each MSPE session includes educational, experiential, and discussion components, as well as instructions for home practice.

Includes handy scripts for mindfulness teachers, athletes, and coaches, and handouts summarizing each session that can be downloaded from APA’s website.

 

Woman’s Embodied Self

Feminist Perspectives on Identity and Image By Joan C. Chrisler, PhD, and Ingrid Johnston-Robledo

This compelling book examines how women relate to their bodies and how attitudes toward the body affect women’s sense of self. In particular, it documents the disturbing, never-ending barrage of standards used to judge women’s bodies. These standards prompt women to pursue life-long body improvement projects, which lead to self-objectification or a negative embodied self. Chrisler and Johnston-Robledo analyze these phenomena using various psychological theories, including objectification theory, stigma theory, terror management theory, and stereotype embodiment theory. Importantly, they also suggest ways to help women and girls achieve a positive embodied self, which includes challenging and resisting pressures to alter and discipline their bodies in unhealthy ways.

 

125 Years of the American Psychological Association

Edited by Wade E. Pickren and Alexandra Rutherford

This 125th anniversary volume describes the history of the American Psychological Association. From its origins in the late nineteenth century, through the two World Wars and the turbulence of the 1960s, to the economic uncertainties of the 1970s and 1980s, the APA’s development has mirrored the growth of psychology as a discipline in the United States.

This special 125th anniversary edition describes the challenges and triumphs that have marked the association’s early years in the twenty-first century.

 

 

Writing Your Psychology Research Paper

By Scott A. Baldwin

This encouraging primer for undergraduates explains how to write a clear, compelling, well-organized research paper. From picking a promising topic, to finding and digesting the pertinent literature, to developing a thesis, to outlining and presenting ideas, to editing for clarity and concision—each step is broken down and illustrated with examples. A bonus chapter discusses how to combat procrastination. Students learn that the best writing is done in chunks over long periods of time, and that writing is a skill that improves with practice.

 

 

 

Designing and Proposing Your Research Project

By Jennifer Brown Urban and Bradley Matheus van Eeden-Moorefield

Designing your own study and writing your research proposal takes time, often more so than conducting the study. This practical, accessible guide walks you through the entire process. You will learn to identify and narrow your research topic, develop your research question, design your study, and choose appropriate sampling and measurement strategies. The figures, tables, and exhibits offer a wealth of relatable examples and tools to apply concepts, including activities and worksheets to practice alone or in groups with other students.

 

 

 

Graduate Study in Psychology, 2018 Edition

Graduate Study in Psychology is the best source of information related to graduate programs in psychology and provides information related to approximately 600 graduate programs in psychology in the U.S. and Canada.

Graduate Study in Psychology, 2018 Edition contains information about the number of applications received by a program; the number of individuals accepted in each program; dates for applications and admission; types of information required for an application (GRE scores, letters of recommendation, documentation concerning volunteer or clinical experience, etc.); in-state and out-of-state tuition costs; availability of internships and scholarships; employment information of graduates; orientation and emphasis of departments and programs; plus other relevant information.

Mindfulness Resources

Over the last few decades, the concept of mindfulness has quickly become a hot topic in mainstream Western culture. Workshops in schools and the workplace are popping up more and more to teach exercises to cultivate general wellbeing and provide stress relief.

Broadly, the APA Dictionary of Psychology, Second Edition defines mindfulness as the “awareness of one’s internal states and surroundings,” cultivated is through meditation “in which a person focuses attention on his or her breathing and thoughts, feelings, and sensations are experienced freely as they arise.”

These practices can be incorporated into clinical psychotherapy, regardless of therapeutic approach, and modified as the psychologist sees fit. Here is a selection of products from APA Books that incorporate mindfulness-based principles:

 

APA Books® 

The Art and Science of Mindfulness, Second Edition

Intention is fundamental to any project, endeavor, or journey. Related to intention is the concept of mindfulness—the awareness that arises through intentionally attending to oneself and others in an open, caring, and nonjudgmental way. Authors Shapiro and Carlson draw from Eastern wisdom and practices as well as Western psychological science to explore why mindful awareness is integral to the therapeutic healing process. This new edition integrates the latest theory and research on mindfulness, with new sections describing the neuroscience of mindfulness and mechanisms of change.

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia

This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

Therapeutic Presence

Therapeutic presence is the state of having one’s whole self in the encounter with a client by being completely in the moment on a multiplicity of levels—physically, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually. The therapeutic relationship is essential to positive outcomes of psychotherapy. In this book, Shari M. Geller and Leslie S. Greenberg argue that therapeutic presence is the fundamental underlying quality of the therapeutic relationship and, hence, effective therapy.

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement 

This book serves as a comprehensive resource on the history, theory, and practice of mindfulness in sport.  The authors present mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE), an empirically-supported, six-session program that can be adapted for specific athletic populations.  Each MSPE session includes educational, experiential, and discussion components, as well as instructions for home practice.

 

 

APA LifeTools®

25 Lessons in Mindfulness

This book presents a practical, step-by-step approach for establishing your own mindfulness practice. Brief introductory chapters explain the scientifically proven effects on health, as well as the philosophy behind this ancient practice. The remainder of the book consists of 25 experiential lessons that guide you through various meditative practices. You will learn to be mindful of your breath, sounds, sights, tastes, movements, physical sensations, thoughts, and feelings as you maintain a compassionate attitude toward yourself and others.

 

APA Videos® 

Mindfulness for Anxiety

Ronald D. Siegel works with a young man who presents with stress-related chronic neck pain. First he helps the client to see that the mind plays a critical role in his presenting problem. Next, using the therapeutic understanding that resistance to mental and physical discomfort exacerbates suffering, Dr. Siegel works to identify the physical sensations and emotions that the client is struggling to avoid. Through practicing acceptance of pain sensations, anxiety, and other emotions, the client is able to become more comfortable with these experiences as they arise, placing him on a path toward freedom from his disorder.

 

Mindfulness for Well-Being

For most people, even the ordinary demands of life can cause some feelings of unease and stress, and these stressful thoughts and feelings may result in chronic mental and physical fatigue or anxiety. Yet, the seemingly simple act of mindfulness may help reduce the impact of stress, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. In this video, Rezvan Ameli demonstrates three mindfulness exercises within a group therapy setting and also discusses the science and practice of mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness for Insomnia

In this video, Jason C. Ong works with a group of young male clients who are all suffering from various sleep issues. In this demonstration, Ong teaches behavioral strategies within a mindfulness framework to help the group learn how to cope with periods of wakefulness at night.

 

 

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement in Practice

For many athletes, engaging competitively in a physical activity while staying in the moment can be quite difficult. Mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE) is a mental training program designed to help athletes, coaches, and other performers develop a set of core skills that can facilitate peak performance and optimal experience. This approach is rooted in the practice of mindfulness and typically administered in a group format, but it can also be used with individuals.  In this video program, Dr. Keith A. Kaufman works closely with a group of university golfers who wish to improve their performance.

 

References 

VandenBos, G. R. (Ed.). (2015). APA dictionary of psychology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Mindful Photography: Finding Presence Through the Lens

By David Becker

Thanks to modern technology, taking photos is such a simple task that we rarely put much thought into it. All we need to do is pull out our phones, point them at something, and quickly snap a photo just by tapping on the screen. And we don’t even have to worry about wasting film, so there’s no need to put a lot of careful thought into making sure we get the photo just right.

Long before digital cameras and smartphones made photography so effortless and convenient, Ansel Adams commented on how easy it is to just go “snap, snap, snap” and take a bunch of photos to quickly capture a memory. However, he advocated a more thoughtful and creative approach. A legendary innovator in artistic photography, Adams pioneered the concept of visualization, which entails seeing your photo in your mind’s eye and “feeling it” before you actually click the shutter. The goal is to capture not just an external event, but also the internal event that occurs in the photographer’s mind as he or she takes the photo. Quoting fellow artistic photographer Alfred Stieglitz, Adams said, “I give [the photograph] to you as the equivalent of what I saw and felt.” His approach resulted in phenomenally beautiful images that continue to evoke strong emotional reactions from their viewers to this day.

Adams’s visualization technique can be seen as a precursor to mindful photography, a meditative exercise developed by psychiatrist and photographer M. Lee Freedman. In her book A Practical Guide to Cultivating Therapeutic Presence, clinical psychologist Shari Geller (2017) offers this exercise as a way to cultivate a greater sense of presence in our daily lives. By presence, Geller means “(a) being grounded and centered in yourself, while (b) feeling deeply immersed in the moment, with (c) a larger sense of expansion or spaciousness” (p. 4). Mindful photography in particular teaches us how to shift from an immersive experience, in which we become cognizant of fine details, to a more expansive awareness of the big picture. It means seeing both the forest and the trees—perhaps even each individual leaf as well.

Black and white image of a lake with snow capped mountains in the background.

In her book, Geller lays out each step of the mindful photography exercise, which can be done with any sort of camera, whether a digital SLR or a mobile phone:

  1. Pause and take three full breaths, feeling your feet on the ground.
  2. Go for a walk, or look around your current space, to find three objects or images: one that you are attracted to, one you have an aversion to, and one you feel neutral about.
  3. Beginning with the first object or image of something you are attracted to, look through your camera’s viewfinder and notice what you see. Be curious about this object. Allow yourself to receive the image rather than looking out at it.
  4. Now either zoom in or move your body physically closer to the object, focusing on one aspect. Notice what is calling your attention to the subject as you zoom in closer.
  5. Now zoom your lens out, or move your body further away from the image. Look and feel, with curiosity, your relationship with this image.
  6. Walk further away and then pause to look at the image with your eyes or the viewfinder.
  7. Now move closer to the image with your body and/or the viewfinder of your camera. How does this image look or feel different or the same? What do you feel in your body as you use the camera or your body movements to see this object from different vantage points?
  8. Repeat this practice with an image of something you feel averse to and something you feel neutral about. Notice how your perspective, feeling, or relationship with the object may change as you see what is present before you from different perspectives. (pp. 187–188)

Like Ansel Adams, the mindful photographer develops a deep connection with his or her subject. This creates a powerful, mind-opening experience for the photographer that is translated into a beautiful image for others to enjoy as well. In capturing the photographer’s internal event, the resulting photo can also cultivate presence in its viewers, especially those who view it mindfully and take the time to really internalize the image.

References

Geller, S. (with Siegel, D. J.). (2017). A practical guide to cultivating therapeutic presencehttps://doi.org/10.1037/0000025-000

February Releases from APA Books!

occupational healthOccupational Health Disparities 

Improving the Well-Being of Ethnic and Racial Minority Workers

Edited by Frederick T. L. Leong, Donald E. Eggerth, Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang, Michael A. Flynn, J. Kevin Ford, and Rubén O. Martinez

Ethnic and racial minorities often face a disproportionately high number of workplace hazards and discriminatory practices that result in greater incidences of disease, injury, psychological distress, and death than non-minorities. The expert contributors to this volume thus present an evidence-based, multicultural framework derived from occupational health psychology research and practice to reduce occupational health disparities and improve conditions for minority workers, including Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans. They review important individual, cultural, and organizational factors that will inform much-needed advancements in policy, research, and intervention.

 

art science mindfulnessThe Art and Science of Mindfulness

Integrating Mindfulness into Psychology and the Helping Professions

SECOND EDITION

Shauna L. Shapiro and Linda E. Carlson

Intention is fundamental to any project, endeavor, or journey. Related to intention is the concept of mindfulness—the awareness that arises through intentionally attending to oneself and others in an open, caring, and nonjudgmental way. Authors Shapiro and Carlson draw from Eastern wisdom and practices as well as Western psychological science to explore why mindful awareness is integral to the therapeutic healing process. This new edition integrates the latest theory and research on mindfulness, with new sections describing the neuroscience of mindfulness and mechanisms of change.

 

men & masculinitiesThe Psychology of Men and Masculinities

Edited by Ronald F. Levant and Y. Joel Wong

The psychology of men and masculinities is a thriving, growing field dedicated to the study of how men’s lives shape—and are shaped by—sex and gender. This volume shows how far the field has advanced and what directions it is taking. It explains and evaluates major theories, research, and applications, with an emphasis on the gender role strain paradigm and related theories. In addition, it synthesizes research on men’s mental and physical health, as well as therapeutic interventions and prevention programs. Special attention is given to ethnic, racial, and sexual minority men. With such broad and inclusive coverage, this volume will be a standard reference for researchers and practitioners in this field and an essential part of university courses on men and masculinities.

Jason Ong: On Mindfulness for Insomnia

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. For this author interview, David Becker, a Development Editor at APA Books, talked with Jason Ong, PhD, about his recent book, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

 

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason C. Ong, PhD, is an associate professor in the department of neurology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Ong developed mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI) as an innovative group intervention for treating chronic insomnia. MBTI unites the principles and practices of mindfulness therapy with the behavioral strategies of cognitive–behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). He writes about the theoretical foundations of MBTI and its implementation in his recent publication with APA Books, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia. He also recently released a video, Mindfulness for Insomnia, in which he demonstrates how to conduct an MBTI session. Dr. Ong’s work has been published in various academic journals, including JAMA Internal Medicine, SLEEP, Behavior Research and Therapy, and the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Chronic insomnia is a notoriously difficult disorder to treat. Even when treatments provide some relief, it only seems to be temporary in many cases. Why is insomnia so resistant to treatment?

Chronic insomnia is often perpetuated by cognitive and behavioral changes that develop in response to persistent sleep disturbances. For example, people who experience several nights of poor sleep may try to go to bed earlier or stay in bed longer in the morning as a means of coping with the sleep disturbance. This also sets the stage for worrying about sleep and modifying behaviors based on contingencies (e.g., going to bed earlier in anticipation of needing to “function well” the next day). As a result, more effort is put into making sleep happen, which disrupts the brain’s natural regulation of sleep.

What is mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)? How is it similar to or different from other mindfulness-based therapies?

MBTI is a new treatment for insomnia that uses the practice of mindfulness meditation to help people with insomnia. It is primarily aimed at decreasing the effort to sleep through the principles of mindfulness and allowing the brain to regulate sleep without “getting in the way.” MBTI is similar to other MBTs such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in its use of mindfulness principles and meditation practices. Unlike other MBTs, MBTI includes specific behavioral recommendations that are designed to promote sleep regulation. Therefore, it might be seen as a version of MBSR that is tailored for people with insomnia.

What are some of the most common challenges that instructors and clients encounter in MBTI, and how are they addressed?

For clients, it can be difficult to practice the principles of non-striving and non-attachment to wanting more sleep. Insufficient sleep does have consequences, such as low mood and energy, so it is very challenging to be patient while practicing mindfulness and allow the brain to regulate sleep. Most people are used to being problem solvers and putting forth more effort to accomplish something, but this is one situation where trying harder does not help. For example, doing internet searches for different ways to sleep (e.g., drinking chamomile tea, reading a boring book) and then trying each of these techniques until something works tends to promote anxiety about sleep rather than relaxation.

For instructors, it can be difficult to listen mindfully to the client who is suffering or to refrain from trying to fix things for the client. MBTI instructors are most effective in teaching mindfulness skills when they

embody the principles of mindfulness, so the theme of non-attachment to outcomes can be a challenge for both instructors and clients.

What inspired you to develop MBTI?

On a personal level, I have always had an interest in Eastern philosophy. As a student, one of my favorite hobbies was reading books on Buddhism, especially those by the Dalai Lama. As I moved into my professional career, I really enjoyed working with insomnia patients. I was trained in cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) but found that sometimes the traditional CBT approaches were not sufficient. Some people reacted negatively to getting out of bed or spending less time in bed, and it seemed like a power struggle to get these patients to comply with CBT. By bringing my personal interests into my clinical work, I found that mindfulness and self-compassion could provide a different approach to help people work out of the problem of chronic insomnia. I was fortunate enough to have a mentor who supported this idea, and off we went!

In your book, you clarify that MBTI is series of group exercises that should be administered by a licensed instructor. It’s not simply a matter of meditating oneself to sleep. Even so, is there a simple mindfulness exercise and/or a key piece of advice that you can offer readers who suffer from insomnia—something that they can use in their everyday life?

The trainspotting exercise can serve as a good starting point for understanding mindfulness and working with racing thoughts associated with insomnia. The exercise entails imagining oneself standing on a train platform and observing thoughts going by as if they were trains passing through a busy station. Inevitably, the mind will wander and we will “step into a train” by engaging in a thought or analyzing it. Here, we practice self-compassion by acknowledging that we have stepped into a train and without judgment, we step off the train and return to platform to continue trainspotting.

By practicing how to just watch thoughts rather than engage with them or analyze their contents, we learn how to work with a busy mind in a different way. Instead of trying to clear the mind to make sleep happen (which is not likely to work) we can be a trainspotter of the mind, which reduces the struggle to control thoughts and allows sleep to emerge.