October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is domestic violence awareness month. Violence between partners and in families occurs nationwide, with far-reaching consequences. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey,

every year, millions of women, men, and children in the United States are victimized by sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. These forms of violence are serious public health problems that can be harmful to one’s health, both physically and psychologically. Furthermore, evidence indicates that violence experienced early in life can put one at increased risk for subsequent victimization as an adult. (p. 9)

The survey indicates that intimate partner sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking has been experienced by 37.3% of women and 30.9% of men in the United States during their lifetimes (p. 2).

APA authors and editors have addressed the scope of this problem, underlying issues, interventions, and prevention in multiple books.

As the editors of Violence Against Women and Children note, “awareness of the problem is the first step toward prevention. People cannot stop something they cannot see or name” (Volume 2, p. 3). We hope these resources can be helpful to individuals or clinicians who might need them.

References

Smith, S. G., Chen, J., Basile, K. C., Gilbert, L. K., Merrick, M. T., Patel, N., Walling, M., & Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 State Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

October Releases From APA Books!

APA Handbook of the Psychology of Women 

Volume 1: History, Theory, and Battlegrounds 

Volume 2: Perspectives on Women’s Private and Public Lives 

Editors in Chief Cheryl B. Travis and Jacquelyn W. White 

Authors in this two-volume set provide scholarly reviews and in-depth analyses, with themes of status and power informing many chapters. Volume 1 describes feminist critiques of theory and addresses the uniquely intersecting components of individual experience. Volume 2 focuses on applied subjects, including psychological well-being, close relationships, victimization, and leadership. 

 

Integrative Systemic Therapy 

Metaframeworks for Problem Solving With Individuals, Couples, and Families 

William M. Pinsof, Douglas C. Breunlin, William P. Russell, Jay L. Lebow, Cheryl Rampage, and Anthony L. Chambers  

This book provides a comprehensive framework for individual, couple, and family therapy.  It also offers practical guidelines for when and how to use strategies from various therapy models and empirically supported treatments. 

 

 

 

Long-Term Outcomes of Military Service 

The Health and Well-Being of Aging Veterans 

Edited by Avron Spiro, Richard A. Settersten, Jr., and Carolyn M. Aldwin  

Contributors to this groundbreaking book examine the effects of military service across the lifespan.  Topic areas include the effects of combat and stress on longevity and brain functioning; the use of memory, cognition, and ego development at various points in life; the relationship between experiences of discrimination and the later development of PTSD; marriage longevity; employment; and the way notions of patriotism and nationalism among service personnel and their families may change over time. 

 

The Essentials of Conditioning and Learning 

FOURTH EDITION 

Michael Domjan 

Now in its fourth edition, Michael Domjan’s classic textbook presents the basic principles of learning and conditioning in a concise and accessible style, with an emphasis on the latest influential research findings and theoretical perspectives. While the field of learning and conditioning is more than a hundred years old, new discoveries continue to be made and new applications of basic research are tackling major clinical problems. Domjan summarizes these developments as well as basic learning and conditioning principles using both human and animal examples. 

 

The Ethical Practice of Consulting Psychology 

Rodney L. Lowman and Stewart E. Cooper 

This book, based on the APA Ethics Code, reviews the unique ethical issues that psychologists encounter when working as consultants in business and other organizational settings at three levels of practice: individual, group, and organizational. 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Elder Abuse 

A Clinician’s Guide 

Shelly L. Jackson  

This book helps mental health clinicians anticipate, recognize, and respond to elder abuse. The book quickly summarizes risk and protective factors, the important role of cognition and capacity, and clinicians’ legal and ethical obligations to report suspected or known elder abuse. Readers learn strategies for communicating effectively with older adults as well as working in tandem with adult protective services. Interventions targeting older adults and their caregivers are also reviewed, along with a summary of needed research. 

September Releases From APA Books!

The Dynamics of Infidelity 

Applying Relationship Science to Psychotherapy Practice 

By Lawrence Josephs 

In this groundbreaking book, Lawrence Josephs argues for a new understanding of the psychological foundations of “cheating.” Drawing on research in social, personality, and evolutionary psychology, Josephs offers a complex but intuitive model that explains how and when intimate relationships work, and don’t work. His integrative and compassionate approach to treatment is grounded in psychodynamic principles, yet uses interventions from a variety of approaches, including mentalization based therapies, emotion focused therapy, marital communication skills training, and mindfulness/acceptance techniques. 

 

 Critical Thinking About Research 

Psychology and Related Fields 

SECOND EDITION 

By Julian Meltzoff and Harris Cooper 

This second edition of a classic text gives students what they need to apply critical reasoning when reading behavioral science research. It begins with a thorough overview of the research process, focusing on how to assess whether the conclusions drawn in a behavioral science report are warranted by the methods used in the research. The book then provides fictional research articles with built-in flaws so readers can practice their critical thinking skills. 

 

Psychological Treatment of Medical Patients in Integrated Primary Care 

By Anne C. Dobmeyer 

This concise volume provides an overview of integrated primary care for mental health professionals. In clear, straightforward language, it describes the benefits and key components of integrated care, with a special emphasis on the Primary Care Behavioral Health model of service delivery.  Guided by competencies developed by the American Psychological Association and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, clinicians learn to use standard resources to work within a larger team to effectively treat a wide range of chronic medical conditions, behavioral health disorders, and unhealthy lifestyle behaviors that commonly present in primary care patients. 

 

Psychological Treatment of Patients With Cancer
By Ellen A. Dornelas 

This volume describes a range of psychological interventions aimed at helping patients cope with cancer treatment. Chapters describe assessment and treatment of common problems including depression, anxiety, fatigue, sexual dysfunction, and cover broader themes in cancer care including the impact on families. Brief, easy to digest, and highly approachable, this is a must-have resource for practitioners and advanced graduate students in or interested in the field of psycho-oncology. 

 

Nancy Schlossberg: On Aging Gracefully

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. Here Andrew Gifford, Development Editor at APA Books, interviews Nancy Schlossberg, a well-known authority on aging and life after retirement.  Nancy will be speaking at Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington, DC (5015 Connecticut Ave NW), this Sunday, April 23, at 1:00pm to kick off the release of her new book, Too Young to Be Old: Love, Learn, Work, and Play as You Age. See more about the event here!

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

--Photo by Rod Millington

–Photo by Rod Millington

Nancy K. Schlossberg is an expert in the areas of adult transitions, retirement, career development, adults as learners, and intergenerational relationships. Past President of the National Career Development Association, Co-President of a consulting group TransitionWorks, she is a Professor Emerita, Department of Counseling and Personnel Services, College of Education at the University of Maryland.

Dr. Schlossberg has delivered more than 100 keynote addresses, and has been quoted in the cover story in USA Today, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Sarasota Herald Tribune, Reader’s Digest, Family Circle, Better Homes and Gardens, U.S. News and World, Consumer Reports.  She has appeared on PBS In the Prime, Derek McGinty’s national talk radio show, CBS This Morning, CBS evening news and is featured in a 90-minute PBS Pledge Special June, 2007, “Retire Smart, Retire Happy.”

AG: In many ways, your latest book feels like part of an unofficial trilogy, starting with the smash hit Retire Smart, Retire Happy which provided a primer on how to adjust to retirement. It was followed by Revitalizing Retirement, which discussed how retirees could reshape their identity and play a vital role in their community.  Too Young to Be Old takes the lessons from the first two books and really emphasizes the idea that retirement is not an ending but a beginning. In it, you discuss relationships, finding your place, embracing adventure, and aging well. Could you tell us a little bit about your own experiences as an author, a psychologist, and a retiree who, herself, is aging very well throughout the process of writing these three books? Do you also see something of a “trilogy” here?

NS: I had not thought of the three books as a trilogy but now that I think about it, each book was an outgrowth of the other. So maybe it is a trilogy. It started with Retire Smart, Retire Happy. I had thought retirement would be a piece of cake. After all, I was an “expert” on transitions and had retired voluntarily. However, retirement for me posed unexpected challenges so I decided to learn how others fared. The result was Retire Smart, Retire Happy. That book became the centerpiece of a PBS special by the same name.

I had many opportunities to continue interviewing and learning about retirement. I realized there was another book which described the paths people follow and the need to strengthen their psychological portfolios. The result was Revitalizing Retirement. This book elaborated on what I had learned in Retire Smart, Retire Happy.

I then became involved in a number of aging projects including writing a transition column for a local magazine. Over time, I realized there was one more—the last—book to focus on aging. This new book broadened my concerns to cover more than retirement. And thus Too Young to be Old was born.

AG: Much of the inspiration for your writing on retirement and aging comes not just from your own experiences, but from the people you’ve worked with in your daily life. Especially after the first book came out, you’ve been engaged by fans and concerned retirees who have come to you with questions about what is often a difficult life transition. What are some of the encounters that have had the most impact on your philosophy and your writing?

NS: Perhaps the most important factor was my own transitions. I found the decade of my eighties filled with transitions—I retired, I became a caregiver, then a widow. I had several surgeries and orthopedic issues. I recovered, began dating and actually went on line, met a retired lawyer, and we now live together. We then moved to a retirement community.

All these transitions make the image of someone in a rocking chair fade.

In addition, many who read my columns reached out saying how they were helped. That made me realize I wanted to keep writing and sharing mine and others experiences.

AG: When Retire Smart, Retire Happy first came out, it coincided with your own decision to retire after nearly three decades teaching counseling psychology at the University of Maryland.  When did you start thinking about ways to retire and age well? Had this been on your mind even in your youth? Or was it your own life transition that spoke to you?

When I was in my late sixties, I went to a retirement party for a much older woman. She was still productive and dynamic. By accident, I left the party walking with two deans. One said, “She should have retired years ago. She is too old to teach and advise.” Right then and there, I knew I would leave before anyone said that about me. And thus began the process of disentangling first from teaching, then advising. My husband and I decided to move to Sarasota where we used to vacation. Since retiring, I have written 4 books and become active in the community. This year will be the first time I have not had a book contract since 1984. So now I will really be retired. I am a bit anxious about it. It is time to reread my own retirement books!

AG: What advice do you give retirees and the soon-to-be-retired about handling this difficult transition?

NS: If someone is struggling to figure out a new path, think about regrets. Is there anything the person wishes he or she had done? If so, is there any way to turn the regret into a plan? That can get someone thinking about a new dream, a new plan.

too young to be oldAG: Too Young to be Old is the first of your titles to really delve into the issue of ageism. America, certainly, is an aging nation. The number of Americans age 55 and older will increase dramatically between now and 2030 – from 60 million today (21 percent of the total US population) to 107.6 million (31 percent of the population) – as the baby boomers reach retirement age.   You’ve written these three books over the course of a decade. What changes have you seen in that time? Is ageism on the rise or the decline? How can individuals embrace aging, and combat ageism?

NS: Ageism is all around us. Even those who are demographically in the old or old-old group exhibit age bias. As the president of AARP wrote, we need to “disrupt aging.” The first step is to be honest about our own ageism, then confront others when they make derogatory comments like, “I live in an old person’s home,” “I just had a senior moment,” “Look at that old lady,” etc.

AG: Do you have some advice on how the children and grandchildren of retirees can help their elders age well and embrace life and happiness after the retirement transition?

NS: Family is very important to most older individuals. So it is important to stay connected. Many of the people I interviewed for Too Young to be Old resented their adult children “bossing” them. Therefore, give the benefit of the doubt to older individuals, give them as much freedom as possible, show respect and help them maintain their dignity.

AG: What is the best thing about aging?

NS: I love the freedom of being 87. I say my age with pride. I never expected to live this long and continue publishing. I like my white hair but must admit the wrinkles surprise and dismay me when I look in the mirror. It is important to remember George Vaillant’s advice–stay young at heart by learning something new, trying something different, and embracing the time you have to spend with family.

Christopher Keys: On Community Psychology

by Kristen Knight

Communities can assume many forms—from online forums to residential neighborhoods, from large collaborations to small groups of people. The APA Dictionary of Psychology, Second Edition, defines community psychology as a discipline “that encourages the development of theory, research, and practice relevant to the reciprocal relationships between individuals and the social systems that constitute the community context.” But these ideas may seem a bit abstract—so we consulted an expert in the field to put them in context.

Christopher B. Keys served on the editorial board of the APA Handbook of Community Psychology—released last October as part of the APA Handbooks in Psychology ® series—along with fellow Editors-in-Chief Meg A. Bond and Irma Serrano-García and Associate Editor Marybeth Shinn. The handbook spans two volumes, and contains 63 chapters contributed by dozens of authors from around the world. It was the first comprehensive work to be published in the field in more than 15 years. Here, Dr. Keys describes community psychology and talks about why it matters.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

Chris Keys picture 2013

Christopher B. Keys, PhD, is a professor emeritus and former chair of the psychology departments at both the University of Illinois at Chicago and DePaul University. He has also been a founder and chair of the community psychology doctoral program in the psychology department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a professor and codirector of the advocacy and empowerment of minorities program in the department of disability and human development at the school. He was the founding associate dean for research in the college of science and health at DePaul University.

Dr. Keys’s research has focused on organizational approaches to community psychology, organizational empowerment, community research issues, and the positive community psychology of disability, and in addition to lecturing and conducting workshops all over the world, he has coauthored and coedited more than 125 articles, chapters, and books on community psychology and disability-related topics. 

KK: How do you define community psychology?

CK: Community psychology is the study of the relationship between person and context and the action taken to improve that relationship by creating a more socially just social contract. More specifically, community psychologists investigate and take action to support and empower persons who have less than their fair share of society’s resources and the variety of community contexts in which they live and by which they are influenced.

KK: How does community psychology apply in our day-to-day lives?

CK: Community psychology examines current social problems and develops constructive ways to address them. Consequently, community psychologists engage in research and action on a variety of important social issues, such as improving educational opportunities, preventing homelessness and enhancing the mental health of those people who are disadvantaged by virtue of society’s marginalization of members of selected groups. These include, but are not limited to, people with disabilities, people living in poverty, people with minority sexual orientations, people of color, and/or women. For example, if you are seeking to improve an after-school program in a low income neighborhood that enhances urban children’s wellbeing and academic performance, then consult relevant work on these issues in community psychology.

KK: What are some of the most important issues that the field is addressing today, and has this changed since the formal recognition of the field more than 50 years ago?

CK: In addition to the topics mentioned above, community psychology issues of particular import today that endure from early in the field’s history include

  • taking an ecological perspective to better grasp the context in which social problems develop and have impact;
  • thinking critically to challenge orthodoxy, such as the assumed preeminence of evidenced-based practice for assessing the quality of interventions; and
  • valuing participation of community members and those from other disciplines as well as partnerships with community organizations in research and action.

Some topics that have grown in importance over the last 50 years since

community psychology was formally established in the United States include (a) celebrating diversity in its many forms; (b) understanding the socioemotional side of community including the psychological sense of community, social capital, and social support; and (c) emphasizing human strengths and resilience in seeking to understand and empower those who face societal prejudice and discrimination.

KK: How do the author demographics and range of topics discussed in the handbook reflect the field?

CK: The handbook authors are a diverse group in terms of demographics, arena of work, and discipline. A notable number are from diverse disciplinary perspectives, nations, races and ethnicities, sexual orientations and career stages. In their diversity, the handbook authors represent the demographic richness of the field of community psychology in the 21st century. The topics addressed by the 63 chapters in 2 volumes include the theoretical foundations of community psychology, the dimensions of context, the methods for research and community change, approaches to social issues, working with diverse groups, emerging challenges, controversies and opportunities, and practical issues related to becoming and being a community psychologist. The handbook also includes topics suggested by experts consulted in an open meeting at the Fourth International Conference of Community Psychology in Barcelona in 2012, and by other thought leaders. Taken together, these topics, while not exhaustive, constitute the most comprehensive coverage of the field to date.

References

Bond, M. A., Serrano-García, I., & Keys, C. B. (Eds.-in-Chief), Shinn, M. (Assoc. Ed.). (2017). APA handbook of community psychology (Vols. 1–2). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

VandenBos, G. R. (Ed.). (2015). APA dictionary of psychology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.