Mindfulness Resources

Over the last few decades, the concept of mindfulness has quickly become a hot topic in mainstream Western culture. Workshops in schools and the workplace are popping up more and more to teach exercises to cultivate general wellbeing and provide stress relief.

Broadly, the APA Dictionary of Psychology, Second Edition defines mindfulness as the “awareness of one’s internal states and surroundings,” cultivated is through meditation “in which a person focuses attention on his or her breathing and thoughts, feelings, and sensations are experienced freely as they arise.”

These practices can be incorporated into clinical psychotherapy, regardless of therapeutic approach, and modified as the psychologist sees fit. Here is a selection of products from APA Books that incorporate mindfulness-based principles:

 

APA Books® 

The Art and Science of Mindfulness, Second Edition

Intention is fundamental to any project, endeavor, or journey. Related to intention is the concept of mindfulness—the awareness that arises through intentionally attending to oneself and others in an open, caring, and nonjudgmental way. Authors Shapiro and Carlson draw from Eastern wisdom and practices as well as Western psychological science to explore why mindful awareness is integral to the therapeutic healing process. This new edition integrates the latest theory and research on mindfulness, with new sections describing the neuroscience of mindfulness and mechanisms of change.

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia

This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

Therapeutic Presence

Therapeutic presence is the state of having one’s whole self in the encounter with a client by being completely in the moment on a multiplicity of levels—physically, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually. The therapeutic relationship is essential to positive outcomes of psychotherapy. In this book, Shari M. Geller and Leslie S. Greenberg argue that therapeutic presence is the fundamental underlying quality of the therapeutic relationship and, hence, effective therapy.

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement 

This book serves as a comprehensive resource on the history, theory, and practice of mindfulness in sport.  The authors present mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE), an empirically-supported, six-session program that can be adapted for specific athletic populations.  Each MSPE session includes educational, experiential, and discussion components, as well as instructions for home practice.

 

 

APA LifeTools®

25 Lessons in Mindfulness

This book presents a practical, step-by-step approach for establishing your own mindfulness practice. Brief introductory chapters explain the scientifically proven effects on health, as well as the philosophy behind this ancient practice. The remainder of the book consists of 25 experiential lessons that guide you through various meditative practices. You will learn to be mindful of your breath, sounds, sights, tastes, movements, physical sensations, thoughts, and feelings as you maintain a compassionate attitude toward yourself and others.

 

APA Videos® 

Mindfulness for Anxiety

Ronald D. Siegel works with a young man who presents with stress-related chronic neck pain. First he helps the client to see that the mind plays a critical role in his presenting problem. Next, using the therapeutic understanding that resistance to mental and physical discomfort exacerbates suffering, Dr. Siegel works to identify the physical sensations and emotions that the client is struggling to avoid. Through practicing acceptance of pain sensations, anxiety, and other emotions, the client is able to become more comfortable with these experiences as they arise, placing him on a path toward freedom from his disorder.

 

Mindfulness for Well-Being

For most people, even the ordinary demands of life can cause some feelings of unease and stress, and these stressful thoughts and feelings may result in chronic mental and physical fatigue or anxiety. Yet, the seemingly simple act of mindfulness may help reduce the impact of stress, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. In this video, Rezvan Ameli demonstrates three mindfulness exercises within a group therapy setting and also discusses the science and practice of mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness for Insomnia

In this video, Jason C. Ong works with a group of young male clients who are all suffering from various sleep issues. In this demonstration, Ong teaches behavioral strategies within a mindfulness framework to help the group learn how to cope with periods of wakefulness at night.

 

 

 

Coming Soon—August 2017!

Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement in Practice

For many athletes, engaging competitively in a physical activity while staying in the moment can be quite difficult. Mindful sport performance enhancement (MSPE) is a mental training program designed to help athletes, coaches, and other performers develop a set of core skills that can facilitate peak performance and optimal experience. This approach is rooted in the practice of mindfulness and typically administered in a group format, but it can also be used with individuals.  In this video program, Dr. Keith A. Kaufman works closely with a group of university golfers who wish to improve their performance.

 

References 

VandenBos, G. R. (Ed.). (2015). APA dictionary of psychology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Jason Ong: On Mindfulness for Insomnia

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. For this author interview, David Becker, a Development Editor at APA Books, talked with Jason Ong, PhD, about his recent book, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

 

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason C. Ong, PhD, is an associate professor in the department of neurology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Ong developed mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI) as an innovative group intervention for treating chronic insomnia. MBTI unites the principles and practices of mindfulness therapy with the behavioral strategies of cognitive–behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). He writes about the theoretical foundations of MBTI and its implementation in his recent publication with APA Books, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia. He also recently released a video, Mindfulness for Insomnia, in which he demonstrates how to conduct an MBTI session. Dr. Ong’s work has been published in various academic journals, including JAMA Internal Medicine, SLEEP, Behavior Research and Therapy, and the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Chronic insomnia is a notoriously difficult disorder to treat. Even when treatments provide some relief, it only seems to be temporary in many cases. Why is insomnia so resistant to treatment?

Chronic insomnia is often perpetuated by cognitive and behavioral changes that develop in response to persistent sleep disturbances. For example, people who experience several nights of poor sleep may try to go to bed earlier or stay in bed longer in the morning as a means of coping with the sleep disturbance. This also sets the stage for worrying about sleep and modifying behaviors based on contingencies (e.g., going to bed earlier in anticipation of needing to “function well” the next day). As a result, more effort is put into making sleep happen, which disrupts the brain’s natural regulation of sleep.

What is mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)? How is it similar to or different from other mindfulness-based therapies?

MBTI is a new treatment for insomnia that uses the practice of mindfulness meditation to help people with insomnia. It is primarily aimed at decreasing the effort to sleep through the principles of mindfulness and allowing the brain to regulate sleep without “getting in the way.” MBTI is similar to other MBTs such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in its use of mindfulness principles and meditation practices. Unlike other MBTs, MBTI includes specific behavioral recommendations that are designed to promote sleep regulation. Therefore, it might be seen as a version of MBSR that is tailored for people with insomnia.

What are some of the most common challenges that instructors and clients encounter in MBTI, and how are they addressed?

For clients, it can be difficult to practice the principles of non-striving and non-attachment to wanting more sleep. Insufficient sleep does have consequences, such as low mood and energy, so it is very challenging to be patient while practicing mindfulness and allow the brain to regulate sleep. Most people are used to being problem solvers and putting forth more effort to accomplish something, but this is one situation where trying harder does not help. For example, doing internet searches for different ways to sleep (e.g., drinking chamomile tea, reading a boring book) and then trying each of these techniques until something works tends to promote anxiety about sleep rather than relaxation.

For instructors, it can be difficult to listen mindfully to the client who is suffering or to refrain from trying to fix things for the client. MBTI instructors are most effective in teaching mindfulness skills when they

embody the principles of mindfulness, so the theme of non-attachment to outcomes can be a challenge for both instructors and clients.

What inspired you to develop MBTI?

On a personal level, I have always had an interest in Eastern philosophy. As a student, one of my favorite hobbies was reading books on Buddhism, especially those by the Dalai Lama. As I moved into my professional career, I really enjoyed working with insomnia patients. I was trained in cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) but found that sometimes the traditional CBT approaches were not sufficient. Some people reacted negatively to getting out of bed or spending less time in bed, and it seemed like a power struggle to get these patients to comply with CBT. By bringing my personal interests into my clinical work, I found that mindfulness and self-compassion could provide a different approach to help people work out of the problem of chronic insomnia. I was fortunate enough to have a mentor who supported this idea, and off we went!

In your book, you clarify that MBTI is series of group exercises that should be administered by a licensed instructor. It’s not simply a matter of meditating oneself to sleep. Even so, is there a simple mindfulness exercise and/or a key piece of advice that you can offer readers who suffer from insomnia—something that they can use in their everyday life?

The trainspotting exercise can serve as a good starting point for understanding mindfulness and working with racing thoughts associated with insomnia. The exercise entails imagining oneself standing on a train platform and observing thoughts going by as if they were trains passing through a busy station. Inevitably, the mind will wander and we will “step into a train” by engaging in a thought or analyzing it. Here, we practice self-compassion by acknowledging that we have stepped into a train and without judgment, we step off the train and return to platform to continue trainspotting.

By practicing how to just watch thoughts rather than engage with them or analyze their contents, we learn how to work with a busy mind in a different way. Instead of trying to clear the mind to make sleep happen (which is not likely to work) we can be a trainspotter of the mind, which reduces the struggle to control thoughts and allows sleep to emerge.

August Releases from APA Books!

 

affirmative counselingAffirmative Counseling and Psychological Practice With Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients

Edited by Anneliese A. Singh and lore m. dickey

Fewer than 30% of psychologists report familiarity with transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) clients’ needs, which indicates a large gap in knowledge, skill, and competence in this area of practice. This timely volume provides mental health practitioners with theory-driven strategies for affirmative practice with TGNC clients of different ages, ethnicities, sexual orientations, and religious backgrounds. Affirmative care entails a collaborative, client-guided partnership in which clinicians advocate for the client’s needs. Chapters cover an array of complex issues, including ethical and legal concerns, working with trauma survivors, and interdisciplinary care.

 

Conducting a Culturally Informed Neuropsychological Evaluationneuropsych assessment

by Daryl Fujii

When conducting a neuropsychological evaluation, the clinician must develop a contextual knowledge base to fully understand a client’s current functioning. Doing so can be especially challenging when the client’s cultural background differs from that of the evaluator. This book helps neuropsychologists enhance their cultural competency, avoid biased assessments, and optimize outcomes for culturally different clients. The author describes strategies for improving communication, selecting valid tests, interpreting results, estimating premorbid functioning, working with translators, and making effective treatment recommendations.

 

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomniainsomnia

by Jason C. Ong

Insomnia is a pervasive issue for many adults that is difficult to remedy with existing treatments. This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

 

 

psych 101 half Psychology 101½

The Unspoken Rules for Success in Academia, SECOND EDITION

by Robert J. Sternberg

In this second edition of his popular Psychology 101½, eminent psychologist Robert J. Sternberg updates and extends a trove of wisdom gleaned from decades of experience in various academic settings and leadership positions. In his signature straightforward, intellectually honest, and pragmatic style, he imparts life lessons for building a successful and gratifying career. This revision features lessons in five basic categories: identity and integrity, interpersonal relationships, institutions and academia, problems and tasks, and job and career. Recent developments in the field are covered, and new questions at the end of each lesson prompt reader self-reflection. Valuable to academic psychologists at any level, this book will be especially prized by graduate students, post-doctorates, and early-career professors.

 

young eyewitnessThe Young Eyewitness

How Well Do Children and Adolescents Describe and Identify Perpetrators?

by Joanna Pozzulo

This book summarizes the research on how well children can describe an event and perpetrator (which is a recall task) and how well they can identify the perpetrator in person or in photographs (which is a recognition task). Joanna Pozzulo shows that although children may be less advanced in these skills than adults, they nonetheless can provide invaluable evidence. She interprets the research in light of developmental theories and notes practical implications for forensic investigations. In particular, the chapters highlight interviewing techniques to facilitate accurate recall and lineup techniques to facilitate accurate recognition. This book is an essential resource for all forensic investigators.

 

transcendent mindTranscendent Mind

Rethinking the Science of Consciousness                         

by Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge

Everyone knows that consciousness resides in the brain. Or does it? In this book, Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge utilize findings from quantum mechanics, special relativity, philosophy, and paranormal psychology to build a rigorous, scientific investigation into the origins and nature of human consciousness. Along the way, they examine the scientific literature on concepts such as mediumship, out-of-body and near-death experiences, telekinesis, “apparent” vs. “deep time,” and mind-to-mind communication, and introduce eye-opening ideas about our shared reality. The result is a revelatory tour of the “post-materialist” world—and a roadmap for consciousness research in the twenty-first century.