Clara Hill on Consensual Qualitative Research

Clara E. Hill PhD is a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Maryland in College Park and one of the nation’s premier research psychologists. A former president of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, Dr. Hill is a recipient of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy‘s Distinguished Psychologist Award.  She has authored or edited eleven books on psychotherapy and psychotherapy research, including the seminal textbook Helping Skills: Facilitating Exploration, Insight, and Action, now in its fourth edition .

In the video interview below, Dr. Hill discusses her book Consensual Qualitative Research: A Practical Resource for Investigating Social Science Phenomena, published by APA Books in 2012.  Consensual Qualitative Research, or CQR, is an inductive research method characterized by open-ended interview questions, small samples, a reliance on words over numbers, an emphasis on context, the integration of multiple viewpoints, and coming to a consensus within the research team. Hill discusses her motivations for writing Consensual Qualitative Research, and briefly describes the key attributes and comparative strengths of an approach that can generate rich descriptions of inner experiences, attitudes, and convictions.

A transcript of this video is available here.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

What is Human Systems Integration?

by Trish Mathis

I get upset when things don’t work. Cars breaking down, computers and cell phones going haywire, household appliances malfunctioning—life’s technical challenges can really frustrate me. For the most part though, these occurrences are mere nuisances. But imagine a crew of firefighters deep in a tunnel at the scene of a subway fire. Engulfed in hazy smoke, they slowly make their way to the stopped subway train filled with trapped, panicked passengers who are desperate for help. Now imagine that the firefighters can’t radio EMS personnel maneuvering simultaneously though the tunnel, or police officers coordinating the rescue effort above ground, or any other first responders on scene: The recently upgraded firefighter communications equipment cannot interact with the older communications system still used by most responders. A technological incompatibility has left the firefighters unable to contact anybody, and in turn nobody can contact them. Instead of simple aggravation, we now have potential injury and loss of life.

38853352Fortunately, the field of human systems integration exists to help prevent such disasters. Professionals in this discipline are trained to look at the whole picture—not only the task of interest but also the people who are involved and the tools they use—to make sure everything functions together properly, without failure, without confusion, without complicated training. Human systems professionals understand our strengths and weaknesses and use that knowledge to guide design processes. They create objects and spaces that complement us rather than constrain us; they anticipate problems and devise solutions; they implement changes in response to evolving needs; they evaluate progress and recognize success.

But most of all they mitigate risk by creating safe, efficient operators and reliable environments. Although the field of human systems integration is young, its practitioners are ambitious. Their goal is nothing less than to have harmonious systems of people, tasks, and tools. Think about it: a world that we can navigate instinctively, with items that are easy to use and don’t break down and that work together? I know I’d like that. I’m sure the people on that subway train would too.

Reference 

Boehm-Davis, D. A., Durso, F. T., & Lee, J. D. (Eds.). (2015). APA handbook of human systems integration. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/pubs/books/4311517.aspx

What Are APA Handbooks in Psychology?

RKelaherby Chris Kelaher

In April of 2015, APA Books proudly released the APA Handbook of Human Systems Integration, edited by Deborah A. Boehm-Davis (George Mason University), Francis Durso (Georgia Tech), and John D. Lee (University of Wisconsin-Madison). This most recent addition to APA’s Reference list is also the latest entry in our growing APA Handbooks in Psychology® series.

The Handbooks program is an integral and growing component of APA Books. With a steady focus on and commitment to best science and best practice, these handbooks address core subdisciplines in the field (e.g., educational psychology, counseling psychology) or specialized content areas within subdisciplines (e.g., aging, sexual behavior and identity). The series launched in early 2010 with the three-volume APA Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Sheldon Zedeck, Editor-in-Chief).

Each APA handbook addresses the key reference interests and essential needs of researchers, clinicians, and practitioners in psychology and allied behavioral fields, as well as graduate students in the relevant areas. The series includes 16 titles now available in print and electronic formats, with some dozen more currently in development and several under discussion.

APA Handbooks in PsychologyThe APA Handbooks in Psychology series is coordinated by the APA Reference Department, under the direction of Ted Baroody. Editing and development of manuscripts is handled through a back office peer-review and tracking system, managed internally by Reference Project Editor Lisa T. Corry, Senior Reference Editor Kristen Knight, Reference Project Editor Katharine Lenz, and Reference Editorial Manager Trish Mathis. The products vary in size, from one volume (e.g., APA Handbook of Human Systems Integration) up to the four-volume APA Handbook of Personality and Social Psychology (with the first five-volume set due in 2016). Each set or single-volume focuses on what is currently known in the area of study, including basic historical reviews, and identifies the most pertinent sources of information in both the core and emerging literature. Individual chapters pinpoint practical issues, probe unresolved and controversial topics, and present future theoretical, research, and practice trends. Cross-referencing among chapters within and across volumes leads the user to a clearer understanding of the complexities of each field.

In the classic reference model, the handbook sets take a meta-analytic approach, surveying the field broadly but in as much detail, and with as much balance given to varying perspectives and controversies, as space allows. The series is not intended to promote any research or clinical bias within fields but, rather, to lay out a well-balanced and comprehensive statement about how each field has developed, where each field currently stands, and where it may be heading.

Carrying the imprimatur of the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and the largest association of psychologists in the world, the APA Handbooks in Psychology® series is the indispensable and authoritative reference resources for researchers, instructors, practitioners, and field leaders alike.

Currently released titles in the series

APA Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology ©2011 (3 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Sheldon Zedeck

APA Handbook of Ethics in Psychology ©2012 (2 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Samuel J. Knapp

APA Educational Psychology Handbook ©2012 (3 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Karen R. Harris, Steve Graham, Tim Urdan

APA Handbook of Research Methods in Psychology ©2012 (3 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Harris Cooper

APA Addiction Syndrome Handbook ©2012 (2 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Howard J. Shaffer

APA Handbook of Counseling Psychology ©2012 (2 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Nadya A. Fouad

APA Handbook of Behavior Analysis ©2013 (2 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Gregory J. Madden

APA Handbook of Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality ©2013 (2 volumes)

  •  Editor-in-Chief: Kenneth I. Pargament

APA Handbook of Testing and Assessment ©2013 (3 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Kurt E. Geisinger

APA Handbook of Multicultural Psychology ©2014 (2 volumes)

  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick T.L. Leong

APA Handbook of Sexuality and Psychology ©2014 (2 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Deborah L. Tolman and Lisa M. Diamond

APA Handbook of Personality and Social Psychology ©2014 (4 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Mario Mikulincer and Phillip R. Shaver

APA Handbook of Career Intervention ©2015 (2 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Paul J. Hartung, Mark L. Savickas, W. Bruce Walsh

APA Handbook of Forensic Psychology ©2015 (2 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Brian L. Cutler and Patricia A. Zapf

APA Handbook of Clinical Geropsychology ©2015 (2 volumes)

  • Editors-in-Chief: Peter A. Lichtenberg and Benjamin T. Mast

APA Handbook of Human Systems Integration ©2015

  • Editors-in-Chief: Deborah A. Boehm-Davis, Francis T. Durso, and John D. Lee