October Releases From APA Books!

APA Handbook of the Psychology of Women 

Volume 1: History, Theory, and Battlegrounds 

Volume 2: Perspectives on Women’s Private and Public Lives 

Editors in Chief Cheryl B. Travis and Jacquelyn W. White 

Authors in this two-volume set provide scholarly reviews and in-depth analyses, with themes of status and power informing many chapters. Volume 1 describes feminist critiques of theory and addresses the uniquely intersecting components of individual experience. Volume 2 focuses on applied subjects, including psychological well-being, close relationships, victimization, and leadership. 

 

Integrative Systemic Therapy 

Metaframeworks for Problem Solving With Individuals, Couples, and Families 

William M. Pinsof, Douglas C. Breunlin, William P. Russell, Jay L. Lebow, Cheryl Rampage, and Anthony L. Chambers  

This book provides a comprehensive framework for individual, couple, and family therapy.  It also offers practical guidelines for when and how to use strategies from various therapy models and empirically supported treatments. 

 

 

 

Long-Term Outcomes of Military Service 

The Health and Well-Being of Aging Veterans 

Edited by Avron Spiro, Richard A. Settersten, Jr., and Carolyn M. Aldwin  

Contributors to this groundbreaking book examine the effects of military service across the lifespan.  Topic areas include the effects of combat and stress on longevity and brain functioning; the use of memory, cognition, and ego development at various points in life; the relationship between experiences of discrimination and the later development of PTSD; marriage longevity; employment; and the way notions of patriotism and nationalism among service personnel and their families may change over time. 

 

The Essentials of Conditioning and Learning 

FOURTH EDITION 

Michael Domjan 

Now in its fourth edition, Michael Domjan’s classic textbook presents the basic principles of learning and conditioning in a concise and accessible style, with an emphasis on the latest influential research findings and theoretical perspectives. While the field of learning and conditioning is more than a hundred years old, new discoveries continue to be made and new applications of basic research are tackling major clinical problems. Domjan summarizes these developments as well as basic learning and conditioning principles using both human and animal examples. 

 

The Ethical Practice of Consulting Psychology 

Rodney L. Lowman and Stewart E. Cooper 

This book, based on the APA Ethics Code, reviews the unique ethical issues that psychologists encounter when working as consultants in business and other organizational settings at three levels of practice: individual, group, and organizational. 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Elder Abuse 

A Clinician’s Guide 

Shelly L. Jackson  

This book helps mental health clinicians anticipate, recognize, and respond to elder abuse. The book quickly summarizes risk and protective factors, the important role of cognition and capacity, and clinicians’ legal and ethical obligations to report suspected or known elder abuse. Readers learn strategies for communicating effectively with older adults as well as working in tandem with adult protective services. Interventions targeting older adults and their caregivers are also reviewed, along with a summary of needed research. 

What is Geropsychology?

David BeckerBy David Becker

Aging is a fundamental part of being human. Although we all wish to live long and prosper—as the saying goes—and to continue enjoying the good things in life, the realities of aging can be daunting. Our bodies and minds weaken as the years wear on, rendering us more susceptible to medical problems like Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. We also find ourselves coming to terms with mortality as our loved ones and the cultural icons of our youth pass away.

Geropsychologists aim to understand the aging process as it relates to mental health.  Practitioners in this area help older adults negotiate these challenges and improve their mental health and overall well-being.

Even though the aging process has been a subject of contemplation throughout human history, geropsychology itself is fairly new. Belgian scholar Adolphe Quetelet is credited as the first to write about aging from a psychological perspective in his 1835 treatise Sur l’homme et le développement de ses facultés (which translates to English as On Man and the Development of His Faculties; Birren, 1961).  However, geropsychology didn’t really start to flourish until after World War II. This rise was marked by the founding of both the Gerontological Society of America and APA’s Division on Adult Development and Aging in 1945. Only just recently, in 2010, did APA officially recognize geropsychology as a specialty area of practice. The American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) also began granting board certification in geropsychology in December 2014.

Some have suggested that the slow emergence of this field may have to do with pseudoscientific myths about aging that persist in the public consciousness, accompanied by the fact that geropsychology brings us face-to-face with uncomfortable realities that we might otherwise prefer to avoid thinking about (Birren & Schroots, 2000).

GeropsychologyThe most significant reason for geropsychology’s recent emergence is undoubtedly the rising population of older adults. According a December 2015 report by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), there are currently 46 million adults age 65 or older living in the U.S., which is more than a twofold increase from 1960 when there were less than 20 million adults that age. The PRB expects this growth trend to continue in the next 50 years, estimating that this figure will more than double to 98 million in 2060. This increase in the 65+ population means that mental health practitioners will be seeing more and more older clients in the coming years.

Although adults in their 60s and 70s are generally quite healthy thanks to modern medicine, clinical psychologist Patricia Areán (2015) notes that older adults still face a number of unique health issues that require specialized care and that most mental health practitioners lack the knowledge and expertise to adequately address these needs. Clinicians working with older adults are also more likely to encounter a number of unique ethical dilemmas (Bush, Allen, & Molinari, 2017). When treating clients with dementia who have limited decision-making capacities, for instance, it can be challenging to balance the need to respect their autonomy with the need to assure their welfare, especially when outside parties like family members and other healthcare professionals are involved.

The recent emergence of geropsychology, therefore, is a matter of necessity that has also been accompanied many new advances in the last decade. One of the most noteworthy contributions is the Pikes Peak Model for Training in Professional Geropsychology, which has helped define the attitudes, the knowledge, and the skills that are necessary to become a competent geropsychologist (Karel, Molinari, Emery-Tiburcio, & Knight, 2015). APA also recently revised its Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Older Adults in 2014. With this rapid expansion of clinical knowledge, mental health practitioners will be well-prepared to meet the special needs of the growing population of older adults.

 

References 

Areán, P. A. (2015). Treatment of late-life depression, anxiety, trauma, and substance abuse. https://doi.org/10.1037/14524-000

Birren, J. E. (1961). A brief history of the psychology of aging. The Gerontologist, 1, 69–77. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/1.2.69

Birren, J. E., & Schroots, J. J. F.  (Eds.). (2000). A history of geropsychology in autobiography. https://doi.org/10.1037/10367-000

Bush, S. S., Allen, R. S., & Molinari, V. A. (2017). Ethical practice in geropsychology. https://doi.org/10.1037/0000010-000

Karel, M. J., Molinari, V., Emery-Tiburcio, E. E., & Knight, B. G. (2015). Pikes Peak conference and competency-based training in professional geropsychology. In P. A. Lichtenberg, B. T. Mast, B. D. Carpenter, & J. L. Wetherell (Eds.), APA handbook of clinical geropsychology: Vol. 1. History and status of the field and perspectives on aging (pp. 19–43). https://doi.org/10.1037/14458-003

November Releases From APA Books!

emotion-focusedEmotion-Focused Therapy, Revised Edition 

by Leslie S. Greenberg

 

In this book, Leslie S. Greenberg presents and explores this versatile and useful approach, its theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, the empirical basis for its effectiveness, and recent developments that have refined the theory and expanded how it may be practiced. This revised edition describes recent research findings on important constructs such as emotional needs, and new developments in the use of EFT in treating anxiety disorders.

 

 

 

language-acquisitionResearch Methods in Language Acquisition

Principles, Procedures, and Practices

by María Blume and Barbara C. Lust

Copublished with De Gruyter Mouton

 

Synthesizing decades of collective experience into a set of practical guidelines for students and budding researchers, the authors of this book introduce a systematic approach to generating, processing, and interpreting reliable and valid speech data. They review a variety of observational and experimental tasks that allow researchers to collect natural speech, elicit specific types of speech, and assess language comprehension. Guidelines for generating data sets by transcribing and coding raw speech data are also reviewed, as are special considerations for working with infants and multilingual children.

 

long-term-careTransforming Long-Term Care

Expanded Roles for Mental Health Professionals

by Kelly O’Shea Carney and Margaret P. Norris

 

Every long-term care setting has the potential to foster healthier and happier lives for the older adults who reside there. Mental health practitioners are uniquely positioned to serve as critical change agents in these communities. This book shows how mental health practitioners can use their full range of skills to create systems that are more supportive and engaging for residents, while also providing the staff with greater opportunities for professional growth and meaning. To illustrate what is possible, the authors explore an innovative practice model that incorporates consultation, training, and interdisciplinary team leadership, in addition to traditional direct care services, to enhance the wellbeing of older adult residents.  Readers will also find practical information about Medicare and reimbursement for direct mental health services.

 

psych-majorsWhat Psychology Majors Could (and Should) Be Doing

An Informal Guide to Research Experience and Professional Skills

SECOND EDITION

by Paul J. Silvia, Peter F. Delaney, and Stuart Marcovitch

 

More students are majoring in psychology than ever before so competition for grad-school spots and good jobs is fierce. What are you doing to stand out from the other hundreds of thousands of psychology majors? Written in a lighthearted and humorous tone, this book shows both grad-school bound and career-bound students how to seek out and make the most of these opportunities. By getting out of the classroom and actively participating in the real world of psychology, students can build skills that will prepare them for the competitive realms of graduate school and the workforce.