Someone I Love Has ADHD—What Can I Do?

October is ADHD Awareness Month. Attention/Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is diagnosed in about 5% to 8% of children and 3% to 5% of adults. Significantly more people than this have ADHD, but have not been diagnosed. The symptoms of ADHD include difficulties with attention, inhibition, and excess activity level, with symptoms affecting each person to varying degrees. It’s for this reason that clinicians determine the severity as “mild,” “moderate,” or “severe,” and this severity can change throughout the lifetime. As individuals age, their symptoms may also lessen or take different forms (CHADD, 2017).

Dr. Russell A. Barkley, expert on working with ADHD in children and adults, wrote the APA LifeTools® book When an Adult You Love Has ADHD: Professional Advice for Parents, Partners, and Siblings. Barkley has both professional and personal experience with ADHD, as his family includes members with ADHD. In this book, Barkley focuses his efforts on assisting the loved ones of adults with ADHD, as problems with executive function (self-awareness, inhibition/self-restraint, working memory, time management, emotional control, motivation, and organization) can affect their abilities as independent, self-sufficient adults. They also can contribute to physical dangers as well, such as substance abuse and reckless driving.

So, what can loved ones do to help? In addition to encouraging them to take their prescribed medication, Barkley recommends assisting in the following behavioral changes:

Teach them to own it, learn about it, and then deal with it. Some adults may be in denial that they have a problem, making progress towards treatment difficult. It is crucial that the first step be acceptance of what it means to have ADHD—that it is a chronic condition. Its symptoms can be managed quite effectively day-to-day, but the underlying cause cannot be easily cured. Help them accept their chronic disability and encourage them to have a hopeful attitude.

Support their treatment journey—whether financially, emotionally, or both.

Make information and time tangible. Create reminders by writing things down in a journal or post-it notes. Make time more visible in planners broken down by hour or digital timers on a computer.

Reduce or eliminate problematic timing. If tasks at work or school require significant time to complete, break tasks down into shorter time periods.

Arrange for external types of motivation or accountability. Give small rewards for completing smaller pieces of a larger project. Ask a coworker or friend to check in frequently to review progress.

Get rid of distractions. Replace distractions with cues and reminders.

Create handwritten lists of social “rules.” Create reminders for the kind of social interactions required of a specific experience, such as a networking opportunity or a wedding. Say the rules out loud or digitally record and play it back before the social interactions.

 

To learn more about ADHD, visit the following:

About ADHD

Children and Adults with ADHD

Attention Deficit Disorder Association

RussellBarkley.org

 

Other APA Books about ADHD include:

Succeeding With Adult ADHD

Teaching Life Skills to Children and Teens With ADHD

Parenting Children With ADHD

 

To read an interview with Dr. Barkley, click here.

May Releases from APA Books!

Toward a More Perfect Psychology 

Improving Trust, Accuracy, and Transparency in Research

Edited by Matthew C. Makel, PhD, and Jonathan A. Plucker, PhD

At its foundational level, the heart of science is that its methods allow for others to believe its results. This foundation is served by trust, accuracy, and transparency. Toward a More Perfect Psychology presents strategies to help strengthen the field by improving research quality. This includes strategies for not just maximizing the quality and impact of one’s own work, but also evaluating and responding to the research of others. Toward a More Perfect Psychology is a vital step in making psychology a stronger, more rigorous science.

 

How and Why Are Some Therapists Better Than Others?

Understanding Therapist Effects

Edited by Louis G. Castonguay and Clara E. Hill

Some therapists are more effective than others, that much is clear; why they are more effective is less clear. To answer this question, Louis Castonguay and Clara Hill compiled this comprehensive guide that brings together expert scholars and clinicians from a variety of theoretical backgrounds. They explore the empirical foundations of therapist effects as a broad concept and propose practical strategies to help mental health practitioners become more effective. Chapters also closely examine specific therapist characteristics, skills, and attitudes that are relevant to all clinical contexts, including therapeutic presence, technical interventions, cultural competence, reactions to negative emotions, and humor.

 

Practical Ethics for Psychologists 

A Positive Approach

THIRD EDITION

Samuel J. Knapp, Leon D. VandeCreek, and Randy Fingerhut

Guided by the American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct,” this book illustrates how psychologists can actualize their ethical acumen in their daily work. The authors discuss a variety of ethically tricky areas for psychologists, including patient confidentiality and inappropriate relationships, and provide risk-reduction strategies as well as a five-step decision-making model for difficult ethical quandaries. This third edition of Practical Ethics for Psychologists includes new findings on the science of morality and on working with morally diverse clients, and ethical issues regarding the use of social media and other online communications.

 

Treating Infants and Young Children Impacted by Trauma 

Interventions That Promote Healthy Development

Joy D. Osofsky, Phillip T. Stepka, and Lucy S. King

Infants and young children exposed to trauma can suffer with developmental, emotional, behavioral, and social problems across the lifespan. Continuing research dispels the myth that children simply “grow out of it,” by demonstrating how trauma impacts neurobiological development and emphasizing the need for early intervention. The authors of this book distill the literature in this concise volume that explores the effects of trauma on infants and young children along with the treatments that are best suited for addressing these effects.

December Releases from APA Books!

entrenchment Entrenchment and the Psychology of Language Learning 

How We Reorganize and Adapt Linguistic Knowledge

Edited by Hans-Jörg Schmid

Copublished with De Gruyter Mouton

This volume enlists more than two dozen experts in the fields of linguistics, psycholinguistics, neurology, and cognitive psychology to investigate the concept of entrenchment—the ongoing reorganization and adaptation of communicative knowledge.  Entrenchment posits that our linguistic knowledge is continuously refreshed and reorganized under the influence of social interactions.  Contributors examine the psychological foundations of linguistic entrenchment processes, and the role of entrenchment in first-language acquisition, second language learning, and language attrition. Critical views of entrenchment and some of its premises and implications are discussed from the perspective of dynamic complexity theory and radical embodied cognitive science.

 

geropsych Ethical Practice in Geropsychology

Principles, Procedures, and Practices

by Shane S. Bush, Victor A. Molinari, and Rebecca S. Allen

Psychologists who work with older adults find themselves encountering a number of novel issues. Determining a client’s decision-making capacity, balancing a client’s autonomy with his or her well-being, and juggling differing priorities from various parties—the clients, their families, other healthcare professionals, etc.—give rise to a number of complicated ethical and legal quandaries. The easy-to-follow decision-making model provided in this book will help clinicians make the most ethically sound decisions possible in these challenging situations. Clinical vignettes illustrate how to handle ethical and legal issues in a variety of contexts.

 

integrated-behavioral Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care

Step-By-Step Guidance for Assessment and Intervention

SECTOND EDITION

by Christopher L. Hunter, Jeffery L. Goodie, Mark S. Oordt, and Anne C. Dobmeyer

This timely new edition of Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care brings the reader up to speed with the changing aspects of primary care service delivery in response to the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), the Triple-Aim health approach, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Drawing on research evidence and years of experience, the authors provide practical information and guidance for behavioral health care practitioners who wish to work more effectively in the fast-paced setting of primary care, and provide detailed advice for addressing common health problems such as generalized anxiety disorder, depression, weight issues, sleep problems, cardiovascular disorders, pain disorders, sexual problems, and more.  New to this edition are chapters on population health and the PCMH; children, adolescents, and parenting; couples; managing suicide risk; and shared medical appointments.

 

starting-career Starting Your Career in Academic Psychology

by Robert J. Sternberg

This book provides a systematic guide for jump-starting a career in academic psychology—from applying and interviewing for academic positions, to settling in at a new job, to maximizing success during the pre-tenure years. The chapters cover all key skills in which new faculty must become proficient: teaching, conducting and funding faculty-level research, serving the department and field, and “softer” activities such as networking and navigating university politics. Given the demands and competition in the field, this guide is an essential roadmap for new faculty.

 

 

supervision-aedp Supervision Essentials for Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy

by Natasha Prenn and Diana Fosha

Utilizing insights from attachment theory and research in neuroplasticity, Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) clinicians help clients unearth, explore and process core feelings in order to transform anxiety and defensiveness into long-lasting, positive change.  In this book, AEDP founders and leaders Natasha C. N. Prenn and Diana Fosha offer a model of clinical supervision that is based on the AEDP approach.  Using close observation of videotaped sessions, AEDP supervisors model a strong focus on here-and-now interactions, with a full awareness of affective resonance, empathy, and dyadic affect regulation phenomena.  The goal is to offer trainees a visceral, transformative experience that complements their growing intellectual understanding of how change occurs in AEDP.

Clara Hill on Consensual Qualitative Research

Clara E. Hill PhD is a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Maryland in College Park and one of the nation’s premier research psychologists. A former president of the Society for Psychotherapy Research, Dr. Hill is a recipient of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy‘s Distinguished Psychologist Award.  She has authored or edited eleven books on psychotherapy and psychotherapy research, including the seminal textbook Helping Skills: Facilitating Exploration, Insight, and Action, now in its fourth edition .

In the video interview below, Dr. Hill discusses her book Consensual Qualitative Research: A Practical Resource for Investigating Social Science Phenomena, published by APA Books in 2012.  Consensual Qualitative Research, or CQR, is an inductive research method characterized by open-ended interview questions, small samples, a reliance on words over numbers, an emphasis on context, the integration of multiple viewpoints, and coming to a consensus within the research team. Hill discusses her motivations for writing Consensual Qualitative Research, and briefly describes the key attributes and comparative strengths of an approach that can generate rich descriptions of inner experiences, attitudes, and convictions.

A transcript of this video is available here.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

Autism and Language

RKelaher by Chris Kelaher

In recent decades the number of children being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased substantially. While the reason(s) for this increase and the best course of action are still in debate, there has been a considerable increase in public awareness of the condition, thanks in part to organizations such as Autism Speaks and the Autism Society, as well as institutions such as Autism Awareness Month.

language-autismSocial interaction deficit and language impairment are common characteristics of ASD. But the precise nature of this disorder’s impact on language development is not well understood. Innovative Investigations of Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder, a recent release from APA Books that is part of the Language and Human Lifespan Series, a collaboration between APA Books and DeGruyter Mouton, will help psychologists, linguists, sociologists, and neuroscientists better understand the complicated relationship between autism and language.

Led by developmental psychologist Letitia R. Naigles of the University of Connecticut, contributors to Innovative Investigations come from a range of fields. Examining both spoken and written domains of communication, they employ innovative techniques to explore the language-ASD relationship. Is the variability of language development and use seen in children with ASD the function of a specific language, so that some linguistic domains are more vulnerable to ASD than others? Or is the variability a function of the individual, such that some characteristics predispose those with ASD to have varying levels of difficulty with language? Naigles and her colleagues provide detailed information about language development, processing, and production among children diagnosed with ASD.

APA Books is no stranger to this topic. Related titles include 2014’s Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools (edited by Lee Wilkinson) and V. Mark Durand’s Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Clinical Guide for General Practitioners (2014).

 

all-my-stripesMagination Press, APA’s children’s book imprint, published Russell’s World: A Story for Kids about Autism in 2011, and in 2015 Magination released All My Stripes: A Story for Children With Autism.

 

APA Videos on the topic include 2006’s Autism Spectrum Disorders, in which Dr. James A. Mulick demonstrates his approach to counseling children with autism and related disorders, such as Asperger’s. More recently, in 2015, APA Videos produced Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, in which Durand (University of South Florida St. Petersburg) demonstrates his positive parenting approach to working with mothers and fathers of children who have been diagnosed with ASD.