November Releases From APA Books!

Making Research Matter 

A Psychologist’s Guide to Public Engagement 

Edited by Linda R. Tropp 

This volume shows researchers how to bring their scholarship to a broader audience.  Contributors explain how to talk to the media, testify as an expert witness, approach governmental organizations, work with schools and students, and influence public policy. 

 

 

 

 

Managing Your Research Data and Documentation 

Kathy R. Berenson 

 

This book presents a straightforward approach to managing and documenting one’s data with enough clarity and precision that other researchers can fully replicate the study. Step by step, readers learn to label and archive different kinds of project documents and data files, including original, processed, and working data. The result is a logical, comprehensive approach for making one’s research transparent and replicable—a vital skill for one’s career in psychology and other behavioral sciences. 

 

 

Relational–Cultural Therapy 

SECOND EDITION 

Judith V. Jordan 

 

In this second edition of Relational–Cultural Therapy (RCT), Judith V. Jordan explores the history, theory, and practice of relationship centered, culturally oriented psychotherapy. Since the first edition, RCT has been widely embraced, with new research and applications, including developing curricula in social science graduate programs, providing a theoretical frame for an E.U.-sponsored symposiums, and enhancing team-building in workplaces. 

 


When Parents Are Incarcerated 

Interdisciplinary Research and Interventions to Support Children 

Edited by Christopher Wildeman, Anna R. Haskins, and Julie Poehlmann-Tynan 

In this volume, prominent scholars across multiple disciplines examine how parental incarceration affects children and what can be done to help them. Sociologists, demographers, developmental psychologists, family scientists, and criminologists summarize the strongest research on the consequences of parental incarceration for children, with special attention to mediating and moderating variables. Scholars review policies and interventions that could lessen the likelihood of parental incarceration and/or help children whose parents have been imprisoned or jailed. 

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is domestic violence awareness month. Violence between partners and in families occurs nationwide, with far-reaching consequences. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey,

every year, millions of women, men, and children in the United States are victimized by sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence. These forms of violence are serious public health problems that can be harmful to one’s health, both physically and psychologically. Furthermore, evidence indicates that violence experienced early in life can put one at increased risk for subsequent victimization as an adult. (p. 9)

The survey indicates that intimate partner sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking has been experienced by 37.3% of women and 30.9% of men in the United States during their lifetimes (p. 2).

APA authors and editors have addressed the scope of this problem, underlying issues, interventions, and prevention in multiple books.

As the editors of Violence Against Women and Children note, “awareness of the problem is the first step toward prevention. People cannot stop something they cannot see or name” (Volume 2, p. 3). We hope these resources can be helpful to individuals or clinicians who might need them.

References

Smith, S. G., Chen, J., Basile, K. C., Gilbert, L. K., Merrick, M. T., Patel, N., Walling, M., & Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 State Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

April Releases from APA Books!

too young to be oldNew from APA LifeTools®!

Too Young to Be Old 

Love, Learn, Work, and Play as You Age

Nancy K. Schlossberg, EdD

As the “Baby Boomer” generation reaches retirement age, an unprecedented number of Americans will soon be 55 or older. More so than ever before, the question on our minds is: How do I age well? In this accessible and upbeat guide, Schlossberg builds on the concepts she pioneered in her popular books Retire Smart, Retire Happy and Revitalizing Retirement with an engaging take on positive aging. Looking at the basic issues of aging–health, finances, relationships, and how to live more creatively–readers will be able to think about and develop a deliberate plan to age happily.

 

trauma psych

APA Handbook of Trauma Psychology

Volume 1. Foundations in Knowledge

Volume 2. Trauma Practice

Editor-in-Chief Steven N. Gold

The APA Handbook of Trauma Psychology is an essential resource to specialists in trauma who need comprehensive information, to practitioners who seek to familiarize themselves with the range of approaches for trauma assessment and treatment, or for students as a graduate level or advanced undergraduate level textbook.

 

 

frailty suffering vice

Frailty, Suffering, and Vice

Flourishing in the Face of Human Limitations

Blaine J. Fowers, Frank C. Richardson, and Brent D. Slife

This work addresses the human condition in its entirety and discusses the pathways to flourishing in light of the everyday limitations that we all must face. How do we realize our best selves and flourish in the face of our frailty, vice, and suffering? The authors address what they call the “breathless optimism” of positive psychology in this unique and approachable volume filled with original research and case studies. This book explains how human dependency, limits, and suffering are not just negatives to be overcome. Rather they are part of our journey towards healing and development.

 

couples on the brink

Helping Couples on the Brink of Divorce

Discernment Counseling for Troubled Relationships

William J. Doherty and Steven M. Harris

Therapists and counselors can find themselves at an impasse when working with “mixed-agenda” couples—where one partner is considering divorce, while the other wants to preserve the marriage and start therapy. Such couples are a common and difficult challenge in clinical practice.

To help confirm each partner’s agenda before taking decisive steps toward either reconciliation or divorce, this book presents a five-session protocol for helping couples understand what has happened to their relationship and each person’s contributions to the problems. The goal is to gain clarity and confidence about a direction for their marriage.

 

mentalization-based children

Mentalization-Based Treatment for Children

A Time-Limited Approach

Nick Midgley, Karin Ensink, Karin Lindqvist, Norka Malberg, and Nicole Muller

Mentalization-based treatment (MBT) promotes clients’ ability to interpret the meaning of others’ behavior by considering their underlying mental states and intentions, as well as clients’ capacity to understand the impact of their own behaviors on others.  This book is the first comprehensive clinical introduction to using this approach with children, 5-12 years old, who suffer from emotional and behavioral problems including anxiety and depression.  Chapters examine problem assessment and case formulation, the therapist’s stance, and treatment termination. The guide also includes a chapter-length case illustration and an appendix that lists measures of reflective functioning in children and parents, as well as validation articles.

 

 

August Releases from APA Books!

 

affirmative counselingAffirmative Counseling and Psychological Practice With Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients

Edited by Anneliese A. Singh and lore m. dickey

Fewer than 30% of psychologists report familiarity with transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) clients’ needs, which indicates a large gap in knowledge, skill, and competence in this area of practice. This timely volume provides mental health practitioners with theory-driven strategies for affirmative practice with TGNC clients of different ages, ethnicities, sexual orientations, and religious backgrounds. Affirmative care entails a collaborative, client-guided partnership in which clinicians advocate for the client’s needs. Chapters cover an array of complex issues, including ethical and legal concerns, working with trauma survivors, and interdisciplinary care.

 

Conducting a Culturally Informed Neuropsychological Evaluationneuropsych assessment

by Daryl Fujii

When conducting a neuropsychological evaluation, the clinician must develop a contextual knowledge base to fully understand a client’s current functioning. Doing so can be especially challenging when the client’s cultural background differs from that of the evaluator. This book helps neuropsychologists enhance their cultural competency, avoid biased assessments, and optimize outcomes for culturally different clients. The author describes strategies for improving communication, selecting valid tests, interpreting results, estimating premorbid functioning, working with translators, and making effective treatment recommendations.

 

 

Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomniainsomnia

by Jason C. Ong

Insomnia is a pervasive issue for many adults that is difficult to remedy with existing treatments. This clinical guide presents mindfulness based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)—an innovative group intervention that can reduce insomnia symptoms. Combining principles from mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy, MBTI helps participants create meaningful, long-term changes in their thoughts and behaviors about sleep. This book reviews new research on MBTI and teaches mental health professionals how to integrate it into their own practices.

 

 

 

psych 101 half Psychology 101½

The Unspoken Rules for Success in Academia, SECOND EDITION

by Robert J. Sternberg

In this second edition of his popular Psychology 101½, eminent psychologist Robert J. Sternberg updates and extends a trove of wisdom gleaned from decades of experience in various academic settings and leadership positions. In his signature straightforward, intellectually honest, and pragmatic style, he imparts life lessons for building a successful and gratifying career. This revision features lessons in five basic categories: identity and integrity, interpersonal relationships, institutions and academia, problems and tasks, and job and career. Recent developments in the field are covered, and new questions at the end of each lesson prompt reader self-reflection. Valuable to academic psychologists at any level, this book will be especially prized by graduate students, post-doctorates, and early-career professors.

 

young eyewitnessThe Young Eyewitness

How Well Do Children and Adolescents Describe and Identify Perpetrators?

by Joanna Pozzulo

This book summarizes the research on how well children can describe an event and perpetrator (which is a recall task) and how well they can identify the perpetrator in person or in photographs (which is a recognition task). Joanna Pozzulo shows that although children may be less advanced in these skills than adults, they nonetheless can provide invaluable evidence. She interprets the research in light of developmental theories and notes practical implications for forensic investigations. In particular, the chapters highlight interviewing techniques to facilitate accurate recall and lineup techniques to facilitate accurate recognition. This book is an essential resource for all forensic investigators.

 

transcendent mindTranscendent Mind

Rethinking the Science of Consciousness                         

by Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge

Everyone knows that consciousness resides in the brain. Or does it? In this book, Imants Barušs and Julia Mossbridge utilize findings from quantum mechanics, special relativity, philosophy, and paranormal psychology to build a rigorous, scientific investigation into the origins and nature of human consciousness. Along the way, they examine the scientific literature on concepts such as mediumship, out-of-body and near-death experiences, telekinesis, “apparent” vs. “deep time,” and mind-to-mind communication, and introduce eye-opening ideas about our shared reality. The result is a revelatory tour of the “post-materialist” world—and a roadmap for consciousness research in the twenty-first century.

 

Roberta Golinkoff and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek: On Becoming Brilliant

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors and editors. For this interview, Susan Herman, Development Editor Consultant for APA Books, talked with Roberta Golinkoff of University of Delaware and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek of Temple University and the Brookings Institution.

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

golinkoffRoberta Michnick Golinkoff, PhD, obtained her bachelor’s degree at Brooklyn College, her PhD at Cornell University, and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship at the Learning Research and Development Center of the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Unidel H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Education and professor of psychology and of linguistics and cognitive science at the University of Delaware.

hirsch-pasekKathryn Hirsh-Pasek, PhD, is the Stanley and Debra Lefkowitz Distinguished Faculty Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Temple University and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her research examines the development of early language and literacy, as well as the role of play in learning. With her long-term collaborator, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, she is the author of 12 books and hundreds of publications.

“I enjoyed working with this dynamic author team on their APA LifeTools book, Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children.  (The book has been widely discussed in academic circles and national media, and is already an Amazon bestseller.)  One of the reasons I enjoyed it so much is that I felt like the book was actually for me: a mom to two school-age kids! Also, I loved getting emails like this: “We’ll get back to you soon about the edits. We’re away at a conference now and Kathy is filming her flash mob this afternoon.” –Susan Herman

How long have the two of you been collaborating?

KHP: Roberta and I have been working together 37 years. We have lasted longer than most marriages. We would have each been good as solo scientists, but when you have a wonderful working relationship it actually feeds creativity. And I think it also feeds the product.

How did you come from developmental science, primarily working with young children, into looking at school-age children and what’s happening in K-12 education?

KHP: The book isn’t only about K-12. It really is about 0-99. If we want to prepare an educated citizenry of the future, we need to think not only about what’s going on in the schools but also what’s going on outside the schools, in the communities in which children live. If we think of education as only taking place inside the school walls, then we’re missing literally 80 percent of the waking time of children.

This book is really more about redefining education for the 21st century. It poses this central question: what counts as success? When our children grow up, what do we want of them as a society?

What I believe the 21st century answer ought to be is: we want happy, healthy, social, caring, and thinking children today, who are going to grow up to be compassionate, collaborative, critically thinking, creatively innovative, and responsible citizens of tomorrow.

What skills do you need to achieve that? You have to work backwards, reverse engineer it. The business community has been screaming for this for the better part of a decade. We want to reduce inequities and we want [education] to dovetail with the skills you need in the workplace.

Do we want to let [standardized] tests tell society what we can and cannot value? Or do we want to figure out what we value and find ways to see how children learn?

 

I saw an ad for an online learning company that says, “Each child is uniquely brilliant.” Is brilliant a buzzword now? What does it mean to be brilliant?

RG: We’re not about making people exceptional. We want to call attention to the fact that children have a vast range of capabilities, and while we’re mostly teaching content in the schools—and content is great, it’s got to be there—we must broaden what we do.

Because in this new world, it isn’t enough to be brilliant in the classic sense of getting straight A’s. Those people don’t necessarily get the jobs now. What matters for kids is to develop all the skills that will help them be better people.

For me, that’s number one—I want to create menschen. I want to create citizens who are members of their community and who play well together, who will function at a high level in their society. We want to help children get the jobs of the future.

For example, if we’re talking about how manufacturing plants are shutting down and the jobs are moving overseas, we’re not getting it—the nature of the workforce needs to change! The jobs that are going overseas are factory jobs. The jobs that are taking over in America are the high-level jobs.

We need to help our children find the jobs of the future, many of which haven’t been invented yet. We need to educate for the higher-level jobs that we are presently importing people to do because we don’t have enough people who can do them.

In your book, you conceptualize learning as consisting of six skills, the “Six C’s”: Collaboration, Communication, Content, Critical Thinking, Creative Innovation, and Confidence. How do you measure the Six Cs?

KHP: Roberta and I suggest that we can give you a profile of skills, using our Six C Grid [shown below]. What’s cool about the grid is that every one of us can look at ourselves and create a profile for ourselves on the six skills.

 

6 Cs6 Cs

Collaboration is how we learn to communicate. Content builds on communication, our ability to listen, to talk, to have a vocabulary. You’re never going to be a great reader if you don’t have good language skills. And yet we’re starting our tests with reading, not with language. You can do letter-sound correspondence until you’re blue in the face but if you can’t translate sounds into a word that you know, then all of it is moot.

We have too much information—everybody’s talking about big data. But if you can’t sift your way through, then you’re not going to be able to use the content effectively.

Creative innovation teaches you how to use that content that you just critically thought about. So you can use that information to change tomorrow.

Kids need confidence to give it a whirl. We have beaten children into just giving us right answers. The creators of the world—the Edisons, the Steve Jobs—they failed many times before they succeeded.

None of these exists in a vacuum. They build on one another to create a profile of learning.

RG: We’re not arguing that we need a new curriculum for the Six Cs. We’re taking the position that, once you’re aware of these skill sets, you can think about how the assignments you’re creating for your class are building collaboration, confidence, creativity.

Let’s talk about Confidence. One recurring conversation I have with friends who are parents starts with, “Do you let your kid…?” Ride his bike to the park alone? Set up her own YouTube account? That kind of thing. How can parents leverage risk to help their kids build confidence?

RG: The New Albany, Ohio chief of police is now advising parents not to let kids go outside on their own until they’re 16. This is crazy, but not uncommon. This sort of thing happens nowadays for two reasons. One, no one goes on the news and says, “Sally had a good day today. She walked to the library by herself!” The media focuses on the bad stuff and this is the kind of stuff that goes around [on social media].

Two, parents are more fearful. Economic shifts have been profound in recent years and have made people worry that their children will have lesser lifestyles than they did. And this makes them focus more on stuffing that content in the kid, over developing the other skills that kids need.

The way it should work is that little by little, children are given more responsibility for taking care of themselves. Doing errands is the first kind of responsibility, and your kid will want to do it because it’s a way of showing that they’re growing up. Of course, you first have to have a conversation with your kids about how to not go with strangers, and about how to use other adults to help you if someone’s bugging you.

KHP: What do you do when your kid comes home [from the errand]? He has an essay for homework. Do you allow your child to have his own voice, as long as he backs it up? Or does he stick pretty close to the book review he’s supposed to do, “This is what A says, this is what B says…” Push him a little further and say, “what’s your take?”

You encourage him to try that experiment. As long as it’s safe. I remember something my kids wanted to do—they wanted to put water in the sink and add electricity to make a lightning bolt! Other than that one, I was OK with [their experiments].

When your child comes home from soccer and says, I don’t want to do that anymore, are you the kind of person who says, “OK well we’re not going back there anymore!” The lesson, when you stay with it, is confidence.

Everything’s a risk-benefit. Some things you may not want them to take apart, like the television. But you can say “We have this old blender—why not take apart that and see how that works?” Or you can say, “there’s this guy who’s been repairing watches forever. Why not go see what he does?”

How can parents advocate for their schools to teach the Six Cs?

KHP: You can evaluate your child’s classroom based on the Six C grid. The grid becomes almost like a map for us to ask, how are we doing as parents? What do we want from our children? How are we providing opportunities to allow them to get to that goal?

RG: Each chapter in the book has a section called Taking Action where we talk about how to create environments that foster each skill, and we give very concrete suggestions. [We want] to awaken parents’ consciousness to what they need to do to help their children be good, productive people.

And we don’t need to keep it a secret from our kids. We often don’t even talk to our kids about the kinds of things we hope they will get out of school. We can tell them why we want them to do x, y, z. We need to let the kids in on it, have this pervade the culture. It would be so much better than just emphasizing the content, which is giving kids stomachaches when they take these high stakes tests. It’s a culture shift that we’re going for.