Confessions of an APA Books Intern

Stevie Davall has a Masters of Professional Studies in Publishing from the George Washington University.  She earned her B.A. in English and Creative Writing from SUNY Potsdam, where she also worked as a marketing intern. 

by Stevie Davall

If you told me a year ago that I would end up as an editorial intern at APA Books, I would have laughed. First because scholarly publishing didn’t have the same exciting appeal to me as trade book publishing. But I have always had an interest in psychology (ever since watching Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island). I’ll even admit to registering as a psychology major at one point in undergrad; I wanted to be a prison psychologist. And second, I wasn’t very interested in editing.  I had assumed all editing was copyediting, with no creative expression—but I was wrong.

APA’s Office of Publications and Databases is big. Alongside APA Books, there is APA Journals, which publishes the latest research in the field of psychology; the PsycINFO suite of online databases; APA Videos, which provides educational training sessions for students and professionals interested in specific topics within psychology; a full Marketing and Sales team, and Magination Press, APA’s children’s book imprint. While I have spent most of my time here working with scholarly books, I have enjoyed sitting in on meetings and getting to know what other types of content the organization produces.

Gaining knowledge of the field through hands-on experience has been invaluable. I must admit, I have learned more in the last few months working at APA Books than I did in the classroom. It became abundantly clear when I first arrived that I would be given a great deal of responsibility.  Despite only being an intern, I was immediately entrusted with formatting manuscripts for development, which impressed upon me that I played a vital role in the editorial process. Once a manuscript is received, the goal of formatting is to make it look as clean as possible, minimalizing any extra white space, to get the page count as accurate as possible. This is especially important for manuscripts that are close to, or over the contracted length. I also notify the production department of any potential design issues.

One of the many perks of an internship is skill-building for my resume. In addition to applying old skill sets to a new professional setting, various assignments have provided me the opportunity to observe, develop, and practice new ones. I have created inventory spreadsheets, sent translation copies to authors, and handled the peer review process.  As a scholarly publisher, we rely on professors, clinicians, researchers, and other professionals to provide feedback on the manuscripts we publish.

I have also worked closely with development editors at APA Books. When a book is transmitted from acquisitions to development, development editors write an editorial review of the manuscript. Rather than focusing on grammar, like a copyeditor would do, DEs focus on broader questions relating to the conception and execution of the work. In other words, they ask, “what are the identifiable issues, and what are their solutions?”

I work with the best, most supportive team of professionals here at APA, and they have provided me with a remarkably memorable experience. I am grateful for the networking opportunities that my supervisors have allowed me to have across the publications department, including meeting and working with other marketing, and production team members, and with other directorates within APA. This internship has provided me with an expansive view of the inner-workings of a scientific publisher.

In the future, I hope APA Books is inspired to continue accepting interns. This is an invaluable opportunity for publishing students in the Washington D.C. area.

September Releases From APA Books!

adults with adhdNEW FROM APA LIFETOOLS®

When an Adult You Love Has ADHD 

Professional Advice for Parents, Partners, and Siblings

by Russell A. Barkley, PhD

In this book ADHD expert Russell Barkley explains the science behind ADHD and how you can tell if your spouse, partner, friend, adult child, or sibling may have it. He shows how to guide your loved one toward the right treatment, and what to do if he or she doesn’t want treatment. Adults with ADHD can be successful, achieve their goals, and live out big dreams—and you can help. You can set boundaries to manage your own emotional and financial stress, too. Here you will learn practical steps for helping your loved one accept and manage their disorder, and pursue paths in life where ADHD might not pose such a big problem.

 

community psychAPA Handbook of Community Psychology

Volume 1: Theoretical Foundations, Core Concepts, and Emerging Challenges

Volume 2: Methods for Community Research and Action for Diverse Groups and Issues

Editors-in-Chief Meg A. Bond, Irma Serrano-García, and Christopher B. Keys

This two-volume handbook summarizes and makes sense of exciting intellectual developments in the field of community psychology. As a discipline that is considered a half-century old in the United States, community psychology has grown in the sophistication and reach of theories and research. Reviewing the chapters of the APA Handbook of Community Psychology, the reader will readily notice several themes emerge: Community psychology’s ideas are becoming increasingly elaborated; its theory, research and interventions more situated; and its reach in both thought and action, more expansive. Ideas that may have seemed much simpler when first proposed—for example, community, prevention, and empowerment—have come to pose challenges, contradictions, and opportunities initially unspecified and perhaps unimagined.

 

career pathsCareer Paths in Psychology

Where Your Degree Can Take You

THIRD EDITION

Edited by Robert J. Sternberg

Now in its third edition, this bestselling volume has set the standard for students seeking to find an exciting career in psychology. Its comprehensive coverage spans more careers than ever, with the vast majority of chapters new to this edition. An advanced degree in psychology offers an extremely wide range of rewarding and well-compensated career opportunities. Amidst all the choices, this book will help future psychologists find their optimal career path. The chapters describe 30 exciting graduate-level careers in academia, clinical and counseling psychology, and specialized settings such as for-profit businesses, nonprofits, the military, and schools.

 

sexual orientation and gender diversityHandbook of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity in Counseling and Psychotherapy

Edited by Kurt A. DeBord, Ann R. Fischer, Kathleen J. Bieschke, and Ruperto M. Perez

This timely volume explores the unique challenges faced by SM and TGNC clients today.  Experts in the field examine how the concepts of gender and sexual orientation are both socioculturally-constructed and can be informed by biologically-focused research, thus setting the stage for flexible, affirmative mental health services.  Chapters cover a range of practice-focused as well as theory-based topics, including complexity in identity, minority stress, and stigma management.  With concise summaries of research findings and detailed case studies, contributors provide an intersectional understanding of how practitioners can work within rapidly-changing political and legal contexts to uncover and affirm clients’ multiple social identities, and build resilience.

 

supervision competency-basedSupervision Essentials for the Practice of Competency-Based Supervision

by Carol A. Falender and Edward P. Shafranske

This concise text describes a trans-theoretical approach that has been the gold standard in supervisory practice for nearly two decades.  The authors show readers how to identify, assess, and track the knowledge, specific skills, broad attitudes, and human values that undergird a series of professional competencies spanning the breadth of clinical practice.  Case examples illuminate the supervisory give-and-take as trainees develop competence in areas such as professional values, sensitivity to individual and cultural differences, ethical and legal standards, self-care, scientific knowledge and methods, applying evidence-based practice, and more.  From practicum, to internship and general practice, the competency-based approach offers clear training goals that organize and focus the supervisor’s attention where it’s needed most.