Streaming APA Videos

In recent years, APA Video has received numerous requests from customers for previews of our videos.  Customers have also asked for streaming versions of the videos.  More clinicians and students today are watching online video on mobile devices, and professors and librarians want to ensure that students are able to continue their studies even outside of the classroom.  We realize that offering streaming video is important to clinical students’ academic success. Although it’s been a long time coming, we’re happy to announce that the APA Psychotherapy Video Series is now available via streaming. In addition, viewers can preview clips from some of the videos on YouTube.

Video titles are available from our third-party streaming video distributors, Alexander Street Press and Kanopy. To view them, you can go to the APA Videos website, find the video you are interested in, and click the link on the right-hand side of the page (note that not every title is available in this format yet). Titles that are available in streaming video format can be purchased for access of up to 1 year for $150, 3 years for $350 or in perpetuity for $499.

APA Video’s YouTube channel featuring APA Psychotherapy Video Series preview clips can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJCR1PYJyRk-iAkZ-ql4vrA

In the preview clips, viewers can see excerpts taken from full therapy demonstrations (in these cases, there is an actor portraying a client on the basis of a composite case) or excerpts taken from the discussion segment of the program, where guest therapists address questions pertaining to their approach, their interaction with and treatment of the client, and sometimes discuss what they might do differently in an actual clinical setting. We are pleased to be offering these demonstrations of our video products, and are excited to make them more widely accessible to students, clinicians, and researchers alike.

 

 

 

Meet Me in Illinois: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Making APA Psychotherapy Videos

By Resarani Johnson, APA Video Supervisor

The APA Psychotherapy Video Series presents distinguished psychologists demonstrating specific approaches to a wide range of patient problems. Designed for clinical training and continuing education, these videos and DVDs were created to provide psychology students and practitioners with expert introductions to various therapeutic approaches and hands-on knowledge of how to treat particular patient issues. To learn more, including how to use these in classes or workshops, see About the APA Psychotherapy Video Series.

Making a psychotherapy training video is uniquely challenging. Imagine you are a psychologist, having spent most of your career either in the therapy room or writing scholarly articles and books. Now try to condense all of your knowledge and expertise into 90-minute therapy demonstration video. Now, imagine someone—let’s say a video producer, like me—puts a kibosh on your expectations and tells you to not try to be so comprehensive and not cover everything you know, but instead to just “be natural… as if you’re not being filmed.”

Simplifying a great body of scientific and scholarly knowledge down to its most concise points is indeed a hardy task that is easier said than done, and it certainly should not be mistaken for “dumbing down.” I understand their frustration, but will never know it firsthand. Although I am in the world of psychology, I am neither a therapist nor an academic, and so I try to put myself in their shoes as much as possible.

Setting Expectations

It’s a thin tightrope to walk. Our target audience consists in part of practicing therapists, researchers, and professors, but the main audience is graduate students. So, my first goal is getting guest experts to understand that they are talking not to their peers, but to the students that will one day be their colleagues. My second goal is convincing the guest experts not to second guess their on-camera performances. I’ve found that lending them a final video of a related topic or approach well before the shoot commences helps them to ease into the idea of being on-camera, and visualize what the end result may look like. That doesn’t mean, of course, that we don’t come across little snags, such as when the guest therapist forgets to look at the roundtable participants and not the cameras when they’re answering a question. But these are small things, and we can usually stop and reshoot whenever they crop up.

Often there are moments toward the end of the day where the guest therapist has a moment to reflect on their performance. This usually includes self-criticism and lamentations, “I wish I would’ve…,” or “Do you think we could redo…,” or the more infamous request: “Can we edit the beginning of the [said] therapy session and mix that in with the latter part of the other session?” The answer is always no. I advise them, as the oil canvas in my office says: “Don’t overthink it.”

Filming

On the first day, three therapy sessions are shot. The guest therapist selects the best one, which goes into the final video product. The next day, university counseling and psychology students and instructors at Governors State University, in University Park, Illinois—where our sessions are filmed—screen the chosen therapy session and participate in a question-and-answer session. They also get to meet and have lunch with the guest therapist, and make fruitful networking connections.

Many key players help make our productions successful: the guest therapists, client volunteers, roundtable participants, as well as our studio crew, and coordinators. Sometimes, we’ll hire actors to perform roles based on actual case material with identifying characteristics removed, or we’ll have actors play roles that are completely fictional and conceived to help illustrate the guest therapists’ approach. We do this whenever we may be demonstrating a sensitive presenting issue or difficult topic.

Group Therapy Sessions

The most challenging demonstrations often are those featuring group therapy. Getting one person to commit to recording a therapy session is hard enough. Asking a group of strangers to divulge their intimate thoughts and feelings in front of other people, on-camera, is even harder. Which is why I’m always on pins and needles the day that these shoots occur. We always have backup client participants on speed dial, in the event anyone decides to renege at the last minute (and yes, this has happened on several occasions). By contrast, the easiest sessions usually depict couples’ therapy. These client participants are less likely to cancel their session and usually are the most eager to get their issues resolved.

Shortly after a shoot has wrapped, most guest therapists say that the process wasn’t as bad as they originally anticipated—in fact, most enjoy it. From viewer feedback, we know that students, therapists, and instructors alike enjoy these videos and find them to be a valuable teaching aid. Overall, what makes this work rewarding is seeing the client volunteers leave the sessions feeling so much better than they were when they arrived.

January Releases From APA Books!

 

ethical choices

Ethical Choices in Research  

Managing Data, Writing Reports, and Publishing Results in the Social Sciences

by Harris Cooper

If you conduct original research and publish the results, this book is for you. Following the course of a typical project, Harris Cooper describes the ethics—and etiquette—behind each stage. He anticipates ethical problems that occur in the early stages of planning research, the middle stages of data management and report preparation, and the final stage of publications. At each stage, he emphasizes the value of early planning to meet one’s professional responsibilities as a scientist.

 

 

 

cultural complexitiesAddressing Cultural Complexities in Practice 

Assessment, Diagnosis, and Therapy

THIRD EDITION

by Pamela A. Hays

This third edition is richly illustrated with case material and includes up-to-date information on the DSM-5, ICD-10, and upcoming ICD-11, plus new sections on working with people in poverty, children, and transgender people; and trauma-informed care.  Each chapter includes a Key Ideas summary and practice exercises, making it ideal for personal education or group use.

 

 

internationalizing

Internationalizing the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum 

Practical Lessons Learned at Home and Abroad

Edited by Dana Gross, Kenneth Abrams, and Carolyn Zerbe Enns

Building on the foundation laid by the APA-sponsored book Undergraduate Education in Psychology: A Blueprint for the Future of the Discipline (Halpern, 2009), this book offers teachers of psychology what they need most to internationalize the undergraduate curriculum: clear approaches to studying psychology across cultures, practical ideas they can use in the classroom, resources that connect students to the world beyond their home campus, and expert advice on how to develop and administer study abroad programs.

 

 

positive psych

Positive Psychology in Racial and Ethnic Groups 

Theory, Research, and Practice

Edited by Edward C. Chang, Christina A. Downey, Jameson K. Hirsch, and Natalie J. Lin

 

For the first time, leaders in the field have come together to provide a comprehensive reference that focuses specifically on how a culturally-informed approach to positive psychology can help capitalize on the strengths of racial minority groups and have a greater potential to positively impact their psychological well-being.

 

 

psychoanalytic theory

Psychoanalytic Theory and Cultural Competence in Psychotherapy

by Pratyusha Tummala-Narra

While psychoanalytic scholars often address specific aspects of diversity such as gender, race, immigration, religion, sexual orientation, and social class, the literature lacks a set of core principles to inform and support culturally competent practice. This approachable volume responds to that pressing need. Drawing on the contributions of psychoanalytic scholars as well as multicultural and feminist psychologists, Tummala-Narra presents a theoretical framework that reflects the realities of clients’ lives and addresses the complex sociocultural issues that influence their psychological health.

 

 

 

psychtherapy teaching

The PsycTHERAPY® Teaching Guide

The PsycTHERAPY®Teaching Guide provides practical ideas on how to use APA’s video database of streaming psychotherapy demonstrations in a variety of classes, in clinical supervision, and in other training contexts.

On the surface, PsycTHERAPY is simple to use: Find a video and learn as you watch a master clinician demonstrating psychotherapy. However, professors in clinical psychology and counseling have discovered many different uses for PsycTHERAPY, including teaching personality theories and psychopathology classes, training researchers on how to code therapy sessions, and augmenting empathy training for psychotherapy students.

 

Watching Psychotherapy

by Ed Meidenbauer

Two people talking: picture this activity, and you will easily come up with an image of psychotherapy. Conversation between two people is a basic human activity. Psychotherapy, to the casual observer, looks like two people talking.  It’s been nicknamed “talk therapy” with good reason, but is talk all there is to it?

Whether or not they have actually been to a therapist, most people have a mental image of psychotherapy due in large part to its portrayal in movies and TV shows. Examples of therapy in popular media tend to heighten the drama of therapy for the sake of the plot. This may be done by stressing the personal dilemmas of the therapists themselves or by featuring clients with extraordinarily memorable presenting problems. Is this truly what psychotherapy is about?

APA Books publishes therapy demonstrations on video—hundreds of hours of demonstrations that are used for training mental health professionals. After watching a number of these (or all of them, as I have), a broad overarching pattern emerges that, on the surface, seems simple but, in actuality, is quite profound. Most of these demonstrations show two people talking and include some fairly typical social questions (“How was your week?” “How are things going at work?” “So, can you tell me more about this project you are so excited about?”). These seem like parts of conversation you might hear every day until you realize that all of the questions are coming from one person 99% of the time, the therapist. Even when the therapist is not asking questions, his or her comments or statements always directly apply to the client. This is a major distinguishing feature of the psychotherapy interaction: The client is doing most of the talking, all of it is about him or herself, usually with hardly a question for the therapist. The strangely imbalanced way these two people are talking is at the core of psychotherapy. In no other type of relationship is one person attending another so closely, so consistently, and for such a length of time.

Watching psychotherapy 2

A scene from a psychotherapy training video featuring Dr. Candice M. Monson and a client (portrayed by an actor).

Being listened to, and more important, feeling listened to, is a great experience, one that we can usually only expect regularly from significant others. In the non-therapeutic relationships we have–whether with a spouse, a best friend, girlfriend, or boyfriend–there is hopefully some give and take. Each person in a relationship has to do some of the listening sometimes and show caring and support to the other. In psychotherapy, such mutuality is not expected, and is even—by design—discouraged. The therapist generally maintains strict boundaries, and the psychotherapy relationship is built for the client’s benefit.

If this one-sided listening were the only feature of a psychotherapy interaction that made it differ from your average conversation, it would be unusual enough and would alone have a powerful effect on the client. But behind this one-sided interaction there is something else going on. Psychotherapists are educated in the intricacies of human relationships, the way the mind works, and how emotion, behavior, and general stressors of life can tangle up a person’s thinking. They have also been educated and trained to use a host of solutions to help the client. To the observer, these solutions may look simple—a question posed at just the right time, or a suggestion to try doing something differently—but they are usually the result of much training and research.

How do therapists learn to do this? It comes not just from years of study—learning the theories and interventions involved in psychotherapy—but also from hours of observing therapy before actually sitting down to talk with a client. In past years, student therapists would sit in on therapy sessions to learn how it is done. This is tricky: The dynamics of the delicate interactions I am describing would be affected by someone silently observing. However, over the past several decades, another way to watch and learn therapy has developed: Watching psychotherapy demonstration videos.

The APA Psychotherapy Video Series has more than 200 DVDs, and PsycTHERAPY® , a database product available for streaming, holds 400 psychotherapy training videos. Whereas the video series is available title-by-title and is ideal for individual training, PsycTHERAPY® is a subscription database, accessible through the APA PsycNET® platform.  It was developed to allow clinical students and faculty to observe how therapists use different approaches and techniques and to share clips of therapeutic interactions with one another.

To help students get the most from PsycTHERAPY, all subscribers are given access to a free book, The PsycTHERAPY® Teaching Guide, that features different ways to use the videos in everything from courses on psychopathology or personality theories to providing empathy training to teaching researchers to code psychotherapy sessions. Faculty at institutions with access to PsycTHERAPY® can download the book from the PsycTHERAPY® landing page. In January 2016, in addition to getting the download, faculty can also request a print version of the book, available for free to faculty at subscribing institutions; otherwise, available for sale.

Psychotherapy can be seen as a unique type of conversation between two people. APA Books produces videos and books to aid psychotherapists as they continue to have these healing interactions, so that they may help people lead happier, healthier lives.