Confessions of an APA Books Intern

Stevie Davall has a Masters of Professional Studies in Publishing from the George Washington University.  She earned her B.A. in English and Creative Writing from SUNY Potsdam, where she also worked as a marketing intern. 

by Stevie Davall

If you told me a year ago that I would end up as an editorial intern at APA Books, I would have laughed. First because scholarly publishing didn’t have the same exciting appeal to me as trade book publishing. But I have always had an interest in psychology (ever since watching Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island). I’ll even admit to registering as a psychology major at one point in undergrad; I wanted to be a prison psychologist. And second, I wasn’t very interested in editing.  I had assumed all editing was copyediting, with no creative expression—but I was wrong.

APA’s Office of Publications and Databases is big. Alongside APA Books, there is APA Journals, which publishes the latest research in the field of psychology; the PsycINFO suite of online databases; APA Videos, which provides educational training sessions for students and professionals interested in specific topics within psychology; a full Marketing and Sales team, and Magination Press, APA’s children’s book imprint. While I have spent most of my time here working with scholarly books, I have enjoyed sitting in on meetings and getting to know what other types of content the organization produces.

Gaining knowledge of the field through hands-on experience has been invaluable. I must admit, I have learned more in the last few months working at APA Books than I did in the classroom. It became abundantly clear when I first arrived that I would be given a great deal of responsibility.  Despite only being an intern, I was immediately entrusted with formatting manuscripts for development, which impressed upon me that I played a vital role in the editorial process. Once a manuscript is received, the goal of formatting is to make it look as clean as possible, minimalizing any extra white space, to get the page count as accurate as possible. This is especially important for manuscripts that are close to, or over the contracted length. I also notify the production department of any potential design issues.

One of the many perks of an internship is skill-building for my resume. In addition to applying old skill sets to a new professional setting, various assignments have provided me the opportunity to observe, develop, and practice new ones. I have created inventory spreadsheets, sent translation copies to authors, and handled the peer review process.  As a scholarly publisher, we rely on professors, clinicians, researchers, and other professionals to provide feedback on the manuscripts we publish.

I have also worked closely with development editors at APA Books. When a book is transmitted from acquisitions to development, development editors write an editorial review of the manuscript. Rather than focusing on grammar, like a copyeditor would do, DEs focus on broader questions relating to the conception and execution of the work. In other words, they ask, “what are the identifiable issues, and what are their solutions?”

I work with the best, most supportive team of professionals here at APA, and they have provided me with a remarkably memorable experience. I am grateful for the networking opportunities that my supervisors have allowed me to have across the publications department, including meeting and working with other marketing, and production team members, and with other directorates within APA. This internship has provided me with an expansive view of the inner-workings of a scientific publisher.

In the future, I hope APA Books is inspired to continue accepting interns. This is an invaluable opportunity for publishing students in the Washington D.C. area.

Streaming APA Videos

In recent years, APA Video has received numerous requests from customers for previews of our videos.  Customers have also asked for streaming versions of the videos.  More clinicians and students today are watching online video on mobile devices, and professors and librarians want to ensure that students are able to continue their studies even outside of the classroom.  We realize that offering streaming video is important to clinical students’ academic success. Although it’s been a long time coming, we’re happy to announce that the APA Psychotherapy Video Series is now available via streaming. In addition, viewers can preview clips from some of the videos on YouTube.

Video titles are available from our third-party streaming video distributors, Alexander Street Press and Kanopy. To view them, you can go to the APA Videos website, find the video you are interested in, and click the link on the right-hand side of the page (note that not every title is available in this format yet). Titles that are available in streaming video format can be purchased for access of up to 1 year for $150, 3 years for $350 or in perpetuity for $499.

APA Video’s YouTube channel featuring APA Psychotherapy Video Series preview clips can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJCR1PYJyRk-iAkZ-ql4vrA

In the preview clips, viewers can see excerpts taken from full therapy demonstrations (in these cases, there is an actor portraying a client on the basis of a composite case) or excerpts taken from the discussion segment of the program, where guest therapists address questions pertaining to their approach, their interaction with and treatment of the client, and sometimes discuss what they might do differently in an actual clinical setting. We are pleased to be offering these demonstrations of our video products, and are excited to make them more widely accessible to students, clinicians, and researchers alike.

 

 

 

July Release From APA Books!

APA Handbook of Forensic Neuropsychology  

Editor-in-Chief: Shane S. Bush, PhD, ABPP

Associate Editors: George J. Demakis, PhD and Martin L. Rohling, PhD

The application of clinical neuropsychology to forensic questions and issues is growing at a tremendous rate. The APA Handbook of Forensic Neuropsychology (a) presents thetheoretical, statistical, and ethical foundations of forensic neuropsychology; (b) describes current assessment measures and procedures; (c) integrates recently published empirical literature on common disorders and special populations; (d) describes reporting, admissibility, and testimony issues; and (e) proposes future directions for clinical neuropsychology and legal matters.

 

Understanding Violent Men

In June, 2017, APA Books published a special, 25th Anniversary Edition of Violent Men: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Violence, by Hans Toch.  This book first grew out of pioneering studies Toch undertook with police offers, corrections officers and prisoners in the late 1960s.  Later editions arrived in 1992 and now 2017.  Each iteration of the book has coincided with eras in which acts of public violence were a matter of widespread concern and debate, from the urban riots in the ‘60s, to the Rodney King beating and aftermath in the early 1990s, to the recurrent shootings, captured and disseminated today thanks to cellphone videos, of unarmed black men and women by police.  Over the years, Toch’s work has helped illuminate and explain how these and similar violent encounters develop—what perpetrators and victims are thinking, why they are thinking it, and what can be done to stop the violence from occurring.

The impact of Toch’s original book cannot be overstated. It essentially invented criminology as a field of study, and endures today as the ultimate demonstration of how applied psychology can help improve people’s lives.

In his Foreword to this new edition, Series Editor Shadd Maruna explains:

The genius of the work obviously begins with its innovative methodology. In Violent Men, Toch pioneers a methodology that has now become known as “peer interviewing” but at the time of publication surely contradicted every known rule of research and common sense—with prisoners interviewing prisoners, parolees interviewing parolees, and policing veterans interviewing police officers. All of these groups were also involved in the analysis of the qualitative data as it emerged as well. (xiii)

In his Foreword to the 1992 edition—reprinted in the new 25th Anniversary Edition—Bertram Karon writes that Toch’s idea sprang from the recognition that

…both “scientific” investigators and violent individuals understand things, but not the same things, and have biased perceptions, but not the same biases. Furthermore, he knew that people talk openly to people like themselves, but that they do not talk openly to people whom they perceive as likely to look down on them. (xvi)

Toch’s method was useful in ways that went far beyond devising and conducting successful experiments. The book’s practical value is so widespread that it has been used and recommended not just by psychologists, but also social workers, parole and probation officers, juvenile workers, and ward staffs across the world.  Perhaps most importantly, according to Karon:

[Toch’s] technique of including violent individuals in the collaborative study of their own and others’ violence turned out to be a potent technique not only of gathering information and insight but also of enabling violent individuals to understand and master their [own] violence. (xvi)

The implications are profound. As Maruna says, Toch’s work enables

 …even the most disquieting acts of violence become intelligible, even understandable. The book achieves, then, what all great social psychology should strive to do: allow the reader to walk in the shoes of the other and experience the world from their vantage point.  With a title like Violent Men, one might expect (even hope for?) a salacious journey into the deranged mind and cold heart of the “other.” Toch’s readers instead leave the book with just the opposite experience, finding they might have learned more about themselves in the book than about mythological superpredators. (xiii)

To purchase this book or adopt it for a course, click here.

Resources

Toch, H. (2017). Violent Men: An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Violence, 25th Anniversary Edition.  Washington, DC: APA Books.

               

 

 

Open Pages: Relational-Cultural Therapy

APA Books Open Pages is an ongoing series in which we share interesting tidbits from current & upcoming books. Find the full list by browsing the Open Pages tag. APA Books will publish Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition by Judith V. Jordan, in October 2017. The following excerpt is from Chapter 7, “Summary.”

The neurobiological data strongly support the notion that we need connections to grow and thrive. In fact, new data indicate that we need connection to survive throughout our lives; we never outgrow our need for connection (Banks, 2016; Lieberman, 2013). We come into the world primed to seek mutual connection; our brains grow, and there is balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic functioning when there is sufficient early mutuality between infant and caregiver and an absence of chronic stress. However, our social conditioning with its overvaluing of separation, autonomy, and independence is at odds with our underlying biological predispositions. Herein lies a profound dilemma, as these competing tendencies produce enormous stress in all of us. Our individualistic social conditioning erodes the very community that our biology suggests we need. We are neurologically wired to connect (to thrive in relationship) but taught to stand strong alone (to be independent and autonomous). Stress is created at a chronic and undermining level when standards for maturity that cannot actually be attained with any predictability are placed on people. Thus, we are told to be strong through autonomy and separation. But in fact, “going it alone,” or being on the outside, creates pain and a sense of inadequacy. We are told not to be vulnerable, particularly if we are male; and yet every day we encounter the inevitability of our vulnerability. We see loved ones get sick or die; we watch our children suffer with illnesses that we cannot always cure. We watch parents and loved ones succumb to the indignities of older age. We hear of random acts of violence felling adolescent boys in the inner city, of children starving in Africa, of people tortured in prisons. Yet, in our effort to deny our vulnerability, we tend to locate vulnerability in chosen target groups who are then seen as “lesser than.” We marginalize and denigrate those who are seen as “weak.” We minimize the real pain of exclusion and marginalization.

RCT therapy offers a responsive relationship based on respect and dedication to facilitating movement out of isolation. In this context, people heal from chronic disconnections and begin to rework maladaptive, negative relational images, which are keeping them locked in shame and isolation. Energy is generated, feelings of worth increase, creative activity resumes, and people demonstrate enhanced clarity about their experience and about relationships. Most important, they engage in relationships that contribute to the growth of others and community is supported.

References

Banks, A. (2016). Wired to connect. New York, NY: Tarcher/Penguin.

Jordan, J. V. (2017, in press). Relational-Cultural Therapy, Second Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Lieberman, M. (2013). Social: Why our brains are wired to connect. New York, NY: Crown.