Streaming APA Videos

In recent years, APA Video has received numerous requests from customers for previews of our videos.  Customers have also asked for streaming versions of the videos.  More clinicians and students today are watching online video on mobile devices, and professors and librarians want to ensure that students are able to continue their studies even outside of the classroom.  We realize that offering streaming video is important to clinical students’ academic success. Although it’s been a long time coming, we’re happy to announce that the APA Psychotherapy Video Series is now available via streaming. In addition, viewers can preview clips from some of the videos on YouTube.

Video titles are available from our third-party streaming video distributors, Alexander Street Press and Kanopy. To view them, you can go to the APA Videos website, find the video you are interested in, and click the link on the right-hand side of the page (note that not every title is available in this format yet). Titles that are available in streaming video format can be purchased for access of up to 1 year for $150, 3 years for $350 or in perpetuity for $499.

APA Video’s YouTube channel featuring APA Psychotherapy Video Series preview clips can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJCR1PYJyRk-iAkZ-ql4vrA

In the preview clips, viewers can see excerpts taken from full therapy demonstrations (in these cases, there is an actor portraying a client on the basis of a composite case) or excerpts taken from the discussion segment of the program, where guest therapists address questions pertaining to their approach, their interaction with and treatment of the client, and sometimes discuss what they might do differently in an actual clinical setting. We are pleased to be offering these demonstrations of our video products, and are excited to make them more widely accessible to students, clinicians, and researchers alike.

 

 

 

July Release From APA Books!

APA Handbook of Forensic Neuropsychology  

Editor-in-Chief: Shane S. Bush, PhD, ABPP

Associate Editors: George J. Demakis, PhD and Martin L. Rohling, PhD

The application of clinical neuropsychology to forensic questions and issues is growing at a tremendous rate. The APA Handbook of Forensic Neuropsychology (a) presents thetheoretical, statistical, and ethical foundations of forensic neuropsychology; (b) describes current assessment measures and procedures; (c) integrates recently published empirical literature on common disorders and special populations; (d) describes reporting, admissibility, and testimony issues; and (e) proposes future directions for clinical neuropsychology and legal matters.

 

Understanding Violent Men

In June, 2017, APA Books published a special, 25th Anniversary Edition of Violent Men: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Violence, by Hans Toch.  This book first grew out of pioneering studies Toch undertook with police offers, corrections officers and prisoners in the late 1960s.  Later editions arrived in 1992 and now 2017.  Each iteration of the book has coincided with eras in which acts of public violence were a matter of widespread concern and debate, from the urban riots in the ‘60s, to the Rodney King beating and aftermath in the early 1990s, to the recurrent shootings, captured and disseminated today thanks to cellphone videos, of unarmed black men and women by police.  Over the years, Toch’s work has helped illuminate and explain how these and similar violent encounters develop—what perpetrators and victims are thinking, why they are thinking it, and what can be done to stop the violence from occurring.

The impact of Toch’s original book cannot be overstated. It essentially invented criminology as a field of study, and endures today as the ultimate demonstration of how applied psychology can help improve people’s lives.

In his Foreword to this new edition, Series Editor Shadd Maruna explains:

The genius of the work obviously begins with its innovative methodology. In Violent Men, Toch pioneers a methodology that has now become known as “peer interviewing” but at the time of publication surely contradicted every known rule of research and common sense—with prisoners interviewing prisoners, parolees interviewing parolees, and policing veterans interviewing police officers. All of these groups were also involved in the analysis of the qualitative data as it emerged as well. (xiii)

In his Foreword to the 1992 edition—reprinted in the new 25th Anniversary Edition—Bertram Karon writes that Toch’s idea sprang from the recognition that

…both “scientific” investigators and violent individuals understand things, but not the same things, and have biased perceptions, but not the same biases. Furthermore, he knew that people talk openly to people like themselves, but that they do not talk openly to people whom they perceive as likely to look down on them. (xvi)

Toch’s method was useful in ways that went far beyond devising and conducting successful experiments. The book’s practical value is so widespread that it has been used and recommended not just by psychologists, but also social workers, parole and probation officers, juvenile workers, and ward staffs across the world.  Perhaps most importantly, according to Karon:

[Toch’s] technique of including violent individuals in the collaborative study of their own and others’ violence turned out to be a potent technique not only of gathering information and insight but also of enabling violent individuals to understand and master their [own] violence. (xvi)

The implications are profound. As Maruna says, Toch’s work enables

 …even the most disquieting acts of violence become intelligible, even understandable. The book achieves, then, what all great social psychology should strive to do: allow the reader to walk in the shoes of the other and experience the world from their vantage point.  With a title like Violent Men, one might expect (even hope for?) a salacious journey into the deranged mind and cold heart of the “other.” Toch’s readers instead leave the book with just the opposite experience, finding they might have learned more about themselves in the book than about mythological superpredators. (xiii)

To purchase this book or adopt it for a course, click here.

Resources

Toch, H. (2017). Violent Men: An Inquiry Into the Psychology of Violence, 25th Anniversary Edition.  Washington, DC: APA Books.