January Releases from APA Books!

adlerianAdlerian Psychotherapy 

Jon Carlson and Matt Englar-Carlson

Adlerian Psychotherapy provides an introduction and overview of the theory, history, research, and practice of this person-centered approach. In Adler’s theory, all behavior has social meaning, and the socio-cultural context of a person’s life is a driving influence on their mental health and life experiences. The task of counseling and psychotherapy is one of encouraging the client to develop social interest—a sense of belonging to and participating in the common good. The authors present a modern interpretation of Adlerian psychotherapy that is consistent with today’s short-term therapeutic approaches and can be used with individuals, couples, and families.

 

handbook comparative psych APA Handbook of Comparative Psychology

Vol. 1: Basic Concepts, Methods, Neural Substrate, and Behavior

Vol. 2: Perception, Learning, and Cognition

Editor-in-Chief Josep Call

Comparative psychology is the scientific study of animal cognition and behavior from an evolutionary perspective. This two-volume handbook presents the different aspects of comparative psychology—behavior, cognition, learning, and neurophysiology—in a balanced and exhaustive manner.

There are 80 chapters across the set, divided into nine parts. History and Methods constitute the first two parts of the handbook. Key events and basic questions (and controversies) that have shaped the field as well as the methods used to make those questions empirically tractable are presented here. The next three parts—Adaptation/Evolution, Genes/Hormones, and Neural Substrate—present the conceptual foundations for understanding the genesis of behavior and cognition, both from a phylogenetic and ontogenetic perspective. Finally, the next four parts (Behavior, Perception/Attention, Learning/Motivation, and Cognition/Emotion) are devoted to the core research in comparative psychology today.

 

generalized anxiety Emotion-Focused Therapy for Generalized Anxiety

Jeanne C. Watson and Leslie S. Greenberg

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), characterized by near-constant distress, is resistant to many treatments. However, master therapists Jeanne Watson and Leslie Greenberg argue that emotion-focused therapy (EFT) is uniquely capable of targeting the maladaptive emotional schemes that underlie GAD and promoting long-term change. In this detailed guide, they walk readers through the stages of EFT and describe techniques that therapists can use to build healing therapeutic relationships with their clients, address deep-rooted emotional pain, transform unhealthy coping mechanisms, and develop self-soothing strategies. Vivid case transcripts illustrate these methods being applied in actual practice.

 

teaching lgbtq Teaching LGBTQ Psychology

Queering Innovative Pedagogy and Practice

Theodore R. Burnes and Jeanne L. Stanley

The goal of all instructional environments is to be a safe place to engage in exploration and active learning. How instructors approach LGBTQ identities is critical for learning and performance in all students, whether or not the primary subject matter is sexual orientation and gender diversity. This book is a theoretical and practical guide for individuals who teach and train about LGBTQ psychology in diverse groups and settings.

Successful New Year’s Resolutions

by Jessica Jeffers

new-years-day-1892263_960_720Another holiday season has come and gone. The decorations are starting to come down, the gifts have been dispensed, and we are turning our attention towards a new year. For many people, that means it’s time to make New Year’s resolutions. Whether we want to lose weight, stop smoking, or start getting organized, January 1 is a popular time to start making changes in our lives and our behavior.

But now we’ve hit the mid-January slump. Unfortunately many people who make New Year’s resolutions give up on their goals before the month is even over. That doesn’t mean we’re doomed to fail, though. It just means we need to approach our resolutions with a game plan meant to encourage success. A 2002 article in the Journal of Clinical Psychology reported that resolvers with a concrete plan were much more likely to have succeeded in sticking to their resolutions at the six-month mark (Norcross et al, 2002).

Abigail Levrini and Frances Prevatt outline one such plan in their book Succeeding with Adult ADHD (2012). Though meant specifically to help adults with ADHD, the basic principles can be generalized to many people looking to make their own behavioral changes.

 

  1.  Set long-term goals

Goals should be measurable, time sensitive, and process-based. What does that mean? You have to be specific when identifying what it is you want to achieve. Your goal should be something that you can empirically demonstrate you have accomplished. But that’s not all. To stay on track, it’s important to give yourself a timeline to define the actions that you will take to reach the goal. It’s not enough to just say that you want to lose weight. Tell yourself “I want to lose 15 pounds by June 1 by going to the gym three times a week and replacing sweet snacks with veggies.”

 

  1.   Create weekly objectives

New-Year_Resolutions_listYou’re not going to reach your goals overnight. Making changes in your life takes time and patience. Get there by identifying steps along the way, so that you practice new behaviors until they become habits. If you want to train for a half marathon, create a schedule in which you start out running just a mile or two and gradually add a little more distance week by week.

 

  1.   Add rewards and consequences to increase motivation

It feels good to cross objectives off your list. But feeling good isn’t always enough to keep some people working steadily towards their resolutions. The concept of rewards and consequences is a basic psychological principle that can help. As you make progress, remember to treat yourself! If your weekly objective was to spend an hour at the gym, kick off those running shoes and catch up on your favorite TV show when you’re done. But remember to hold yourself accountable if you slip-up. These consequences don’t need to be big—if you decide to skip your workout on Wednesday, the consequence can be as simple as also skipping that grande latte on Thursday morning.

 

  1.   Use metacognition to discover what works

Metacognition is defined as the “awareness of one’s own cognitive processes, often involving a conscious attempt to control them” (VandenBos, 2015). In this context, it means thinking about the way you approach your goals, acknowledging what works, and identifying how you can change what doesn’t work. Levrini and Prevatt suggest tracking your progress by keeping a journal. As you notice patterns emerging, you can adjust your weekly objectives, rewards, or consequences accordingly.

 

Committing to long-term change can be difficult, but applying these psychological principles and making a plan can go a long way towards helping you succeed with your New Year’s resolutions.

 

References

Levrini, A., & Prevatt, F. F. (2012). Succeeding With Adult ADHD: Daily Strategies to Help You Achieve Your Goals and Manage Your Life. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Norcross, J.C., Mrykalo, M.S., & Blagys, M.D. (2002). Auld Lang Syne: Success Predictors, Change Processes, and Self-Reported Outcomes of New Year’s Resolvers and Nonresolvers. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 58(4), 397-405.

VandenBos, G. R. (Ed.). (2015). APA Dictionary of Psychology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

December Releases from APA Books!

entrenchment Entrenchment and the Psychology of Language Learning 

How We Reorganize and Adapt Linguistic Knowledge

Edited by Hans-Jörg Schmid

Copublished with De Gruyter Mouton

This volume enlists more than two dozen experts in the fields of linguistics, psycholinguistics, neurology, and cognitive psychology to investigate the concept of entrenchment—the ongoing reorganization and adaptation of communicative knowledge.  Entrenchment posits that our linguistic knowledge is continuously refreshed and reorganized under the influence of social interactions.  Contributors examine the psychological foundations of linguistic entrenchment processes, and the role of entrenchment in first-language acquisition, second language learning, and language attrition. Critical views of entrenchment and some of its premises and implications are discussed from the perspective of dynamic complexity theory and radical embodied cognitive science.

 

geropsych Ethical Practice in Geropsychology

Principles, Procedures, and Practices

by Shane S. Bush, Victor A. Molinari, and Rebecca S. Allen

Psychologists who work with older adults find themselves encountering a number of novel issues. Determining a client’s decision-making capacity, balancing a client’s autonomy with his or her well-being, and juggling differing priorities from various parties—the clients, their families, other healthcare professionals, etc.—give rise to a number of complicated ethical and legal quandaries. The easy-to-follow decision-making model provided in this book will help clinicians make the most ethically sound decisions possible in these challenging situations. Clinical vignettes illustrate how to handle ethical and legal issues in a variety of contexts.

 

integrated-behavioral Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care

Step-By-Step Guidance for Assessment and Intervention

SECTOND EDITION

by Christopher L. Hunter, Jeffery L. Goodie, Mark S. Oordt, and Anne C. Dobmeyer

This timely new edition of Integrated Behavioral Health in Primary Care brings the reader up to speed with the changing aspects of primary care service delivery in response to the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), the Triple-Aim health approach, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Drawing on research evidence and years of experience, the authors provide practical information and guidance for behavioral health care practitioners who wish to work more effectively in the fast-paced setting of primary care, and provide detailed advice for addressing common health problems such as generalized anxiety disorder, depression, weight issues, sleep problems, cardiovascular disorders, pain disorders, sexual problems, and more.  New to this edition are chapters on population health and the PCMH; children, adolescents, and parenting; couples; managing suicide risk; and shared medical appointments.

 

starting-career Starting Your Career in Academic Psychology

by Robert J. Sternberg

This book provides a systematic guide for jump-starting a career in academic psychology—from applying and interviewing for academic positions, to settling in at a new job, to maximizing success during the pre-tenure years. The chapters cover all key skills in which new faculty must become proficient: teaching, conducting and funding faculty-level research, serving the department and field, and “softer” activities such as networking and navigating university politics. Given the demands and competition in the field, this guide is an essential roadmap for new faculty.

 

 

supervision-aedp Supervision Essentials for Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy

by Natasha Prenn and Diana Fosha

Utilizing insights from attachment theory and research in neuroplasticity, Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) clinicians help clients unearth, explore and process core feelings in order to transform anxiety and defensiveness into long-lasting, positive change.  In this book, AEDP founders and leaders Natasha C. N. Prenn and Diana Fosha offer a model of clinical supervision that is based on the AEDP approach.  Using close observation of videotaped sessions, AEDP supervisors model a strong focus on here-and-now interactions, with a full awareness of affective resonance, empathy, and dyadic affect regulation phenomena.  The goal is to offer trainees a visceral, transformative experience that complements their growing intellectual understanding of how change occurs in AEDP.

Jason Ong: On Mindfulness for Insomnia

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. For this author interview, David Becker, a Development Editor at APA Books, talked with Jason Ong, PhD, about his recent book, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia.

 

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason Ong, PhD, Neurology/Sleep Disorders

Jason C. Ong, PhD, is an associate professor in the department of neurology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Ong developed mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI) as an innovative group intervention for treating chronic insomnia. MBTI unites the principles and practices of mindfulness therapy with the behavioral strategies of cognitive–behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). He writes about the theoretical foundations of MBTI and its implementation in his recent publication with APA Books, Mindfulness-Based Therapy for Insomnia. He also recently released a video, Mindfulness for Insomnia, in which he demonstrates how to conduct an MBTI session. Dr. Ong’s work has been published in various academic journals, including JAMA Internal Medicine, SLEEP, Behavior Research and Therapy, and the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Chronic insomnia is a notoriously difficult disorder to treat. Even when treatments provide some relief, it only seems to be temporary in many cases. Why is insomnia so resistant to treatment?

Chronic insomnia is often perpetuated by cognitive and behavioral changes that develop in response to persistent sleep disturbances. For example, people who experience several nights of poor sleep may try to go to bed earlier or stay in bed longer in the morning as a means of coping with the sleep disturbance. This also sets the stage for worrying about sleep and modifying behaviors based on contingencies (e.g., going to bed earlier in anticipation of needing to “function well” the next day). As a result, more effort is put into making sleep happen, which disrupts the brain’s natural regulation of sleep.

What is mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI)? How is it similar to or different from other mindfulness-based therapies?

MBTI is a new treatment for insomnia that uses the practice of mindfulness meditation to help people with insomnia. It is primarily aimed at decreasing the effort to sleep through the principles of mindfulness and allowing the brain to regulate sleep without “getting in the way.” MBTI is similar to other MBTs such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in its use of mindfulness principles and meditation practices. Unlike other MBTs, MBTI includes specific behavioral recommendations that are designed to promote sleep regulation. Therefore, it might be seen as a version of MBSR that is tailored for people with insomnia.

What are some of the most common challenges that instructors and clients encounter in MBTI, and how are they addressed?

For clients, it can be difficult to practice the principles of non-striving and non-attachment to wanting more sleep. Insufficient sleep does have consequences, such as low mood and energy, so it is very challenging to be patient while practicing mindfulness and allow the brain to regulate sleep. Most people are used to being problem solvers and putting forth more effort to accomplish something, but this is one situation where trying harder does not help. For example, doing internet searches for different ways to sleep (e.g., drinking chamomile tea, reading a boring book) and then trying each of these techniques until something works tends to promote anxiety about sleep rather than relaxation.

For instructors, it can be difficult to listen mindfully to the client who is suffering or to refrain from trying to fix things for the client. MBTI instructors are most effective in teaching mindfulness skills when they

embody the principles of mindfulness, so the theme of non-attachment to outcomes can be a challenge for both instructors and clients.

What inspired you to develop MBTI?

On a personal level, I have always had an interest in Eastern philosophy. As a student, one of my favorite hobbies was reading books on Buddhism, especially those by the Dalai Lama. As I moved into my professional career, I really enjoyed working with insomnia patients. I was trained in cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) but found that sometimes the traditional CBT approaches were not sufficient. Some people reacted negatively to getting out of bed or spending less time in bed, and it seemed like a power struggle to get these patients to comply with CBT. By bringing my personal interests into my clinical work, I found that mindfulness and self-compassion could provide a different approach to help people work out of the problem of chronic insomnia. I was fortunate enough to have a mentor who supported this idea, and off we went!

In your book, you clarify that MBTI is series of group exercises that should be administered by a licensed instructor. It’s not simply a matter of meditating oneself to sleep. Even so, is there a simple mindfulness exercise and/or a key piece of advice that you can offer readers who suffer from insomnia—something that they can use in their everyday life?

The trainspotting exercise can serve as a good starting point for understanding mindfulness and working with racing thoughts associated with insomnia. The exercise entails imagining oneself standing on a train platform and observing thoughts going by as if they were trains passing through a busy station. Inevitably, the mind will wander and we will “step into a train” by engaging in a thought or analyzing it. Here, we practice self-compassion by acknowledging that we have stepped into a train and without judgment, we step off the train and return to platform to continue trainspotting.

By practicing how to just watch thoughts rather than engage with them or analyze their contents, we learn how to work with a busy mind in a different way. Instead of trying to clear the mind to make sleep happen (which is not likely to work) we can be a trainspotter of the mind, which reduces the struggle to control thoughts and allows sleep to emerge.

Open Pages: Clinical Handbook of Psychology

The American Psychological Association recently released the 20th publication in the APA Handbooks in Psychology® series. The five volumes of the APA Handbook of Clinical Psychology actively reflect the state of the art in clinical psychology—science, practice, research, theory, and training—and comprehensively cover our multifaceted and vibrant discipline. Each volume surveys different areas of the largest subfield of psychology:

handbook clinical psych

  1. Clinical Psychology: Roots and Branches;
  1. Clinical Psychology: Theory and Research;
  1. Clinical Psychology: Applications and Methods;
  1. Clinical Psychology: Psychopathology and Health; and
  1. Clinical Psychology: Education and Profession. (Norcross, VandenBos, & Freedheim, 2016).

In this excerpt from the Introduction to the Handbook, the Editors-in-Chief describe their guiding principles:

Throughout the five volumes, authors were asked to infuse their chapters with three themes:

diversity, evidence-based practice, and international contributions. Contributors were asked to mind this tripartite commitment as they considered potential coauthors and drafted their chapters. These superordinate themes are evidenced in content, contributors, and citations throughout the handbook.

Diversity has become a cardinal feature of contemporary clinical psychology. It has been incorporated in word, if not always deed, into the teaching curriculum, into practice guidelines, into theoretical revisions, into research conventions, and into professional ethics. For the purposes of this handbook, we have adapted the APA ethics definition of diversity as referring to age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, and other facets of personal identity and their intersections (APA, 2010).

Evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychology refers to the integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences (APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice, 2006). EBP is a global juggernaut requiring solid research evidence to guide practice and training. Properly conceptualized, however, EBP does not end with the research results; it begins with research findings integrated with the psychologist’s expertise and then tailored to the unique patient. EBP requires all three legs. Clinical psychologists have largely embraced the properly conceptualized version of EBP because it collaboratively integrates the researcher, the psychologist, and the client.

International or global aptly characterizes the state of clinical psychology. Whereas in the 1960s there were probably more psychologists in the United States than in all other nations combined, this is assuredly not the case today. No more than a quarter of all psychologists are now located within the borders of the United States (APA Office of International Affairs, 2015). Contributors were asked to incorporate research, theory, and practice from throughout the world into their respective chapters. In several instances, we commissioned entire chapters to address the international scene; Volume 5, for example, has a chapter devoted to educational paths around the world and another to professional ethics around the world.

—from “Introduction to the Handbook,” pp. xxiii–xxiv, in APA Handbook of Clinical Psychology (Vol 1) by John C. Norcross, Gary R. VandenBos, and Donald K. Freedheim (Editors-in-Chief). Copyright © 2016 by the American Psychological Association. All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, including, but not limited to, the process of scanning and digitization, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher.