Student and Career Resources

Over the past several months, APA Books has released a number of resources geared towards helping students navigate their academic and career choices. Here’s a round-up of those titles:

What Psychology Majors Could (and Should) Be Doing: A Guide to Research Experience, Professional Skills, and Your Options After College

This book will help undergraduate psychology students gain a competitive advantage for life after college, whether their plans include graduate school or work. Professional research experience remains the most important avenue for fostering and demonstrating the skills that employers and grad schools want—skills like writing, public speaking, and statistical reasoning. Thus, the authors emphasize ways to get involved in scholarly research.

Updated and expanded, this second edition includes tips for writing CVs and personal statements, empirically validated strategies for succeeding in classes, and guidance to help students think about their options after college. This consummate guide will help students get the most out of your psychology degree!

Career Paths in Psychology: Where Your Degree Can Take You, Third Editioncareer paths

An advanced degree in psychology offers an extremely wide range of rewarding career opportunities. This bestselling volume sets the standard for students seeking an exciting career in psychology. Its comprehensive coverage spans more careers than ever, with the vast majority of chapters new to this third edition.

The chapters describe 30 different graduate-level careers for those holding a PhD, EdD, or PsyD in three distinct areas of endeavor:

Academia

  • clinical and counseling psychology
  • specialized settings such as for-profit businesses, nonprofits, the military, and schools

Each chapter explores a different career, from typical daily activities, the approximate range of compensation, and advantages and disadvantages of the career, to opportunities for employment and advancement, and how to plan one’s educational and professional experiences to prepare for this specialty. The authors—all highly accomplished professionals—were selected for their distinction in their field, their years of experience, and their ability to communicate their passion.

Graduate Study in Psychology, 2017 Edition

Graduate Study in Psychology is the best source of information related to graduate programs in psychology and provides information related to approximately 600 graduate programs in psychology in the U.S. and Canada.

Graduate Study in Psychology, 2017 Edition contains information about the number of applications received by a program; the number of individuals accepted in each program; dates for applications and admission; types of information required for an application (GRE scores, letters of recommendation, documentation concerning volunteer or clinical experience, etc.); in-state and out-of-state tuition costs; availability of internships and scholarships; employment information of graduates; orientation and emphasis of departments and programs; plus other relevant information.

Starting Your Career in Academic Psychology

This book provides a systematic guide for jump-starting a career in academic psychology—from applying and interviewing for academic positions, to settling in at a new job, to maximizing success during the pre-tenure years. The chapters cover all key skills in which new faculty must become proficient: teaching, conducting and funding faculty-level research, serving the department and field, and “softer” activities such as networking and navigating university politics. Given the demands and competition in the field, this guide is an essential roadmap for new faculty.

psych 101 halfPsychology 101½: The Unspoken Rules for Success in Academia, Second Edition

In this second edition of his popular Psychology 101½, eminent psychologist Robert J. Sternberg updates and extends a trove of wisdom gleaned from decades of experience in various academic settings and leadership positions. In his signature straightforward, intellectually honest, and pragmatic style, he imparts life lessons for building a successful and gratifying career. This revision features lessons in five basic categories: identity and integrity, interpersonal relationships, institutions and academia, problems and tasks, and job and career. Recent developments in the field are covered, and new questions at the end of each lesson prompt reader self-reflection. Valuable to academic psychologists at any level, this book will be especially prized by graduate students, post-doctorates, and early-career professors.

March Releases from APA Books!

therapeutic presence

A Practical Guide to Cultivating Therapeutic Presence  

Shari M. Geller

Being fully present with clients can be challenging for health practitioners, given the emotional demands of their intensive work combined with any number of physical and mental distractions, which can make it difficult to establish a healing therapeutic alliance. In this practical guide, author Shari Geller translates empirical research—including neurophysiological evidence—into simple exercises that clinicians of all theoretical persuasions can use to set a pre-session foundation for presence and develop presence throughout therapy. Geller also emphasizes therapist self-care with practices that clinicians can implement in their daily lives, which ultimately translates into more effective therapy.

 

teaching statisticsActivities for Teaching Statistics and Research Methods

A Guide for Psychology Instructors

Edited by Jeffrey R. Stowell and William E. Addison

Statistics and research methods are core components of both Advanced Placement and undergraduate psychology curricula.  Yet, these courses are often challenging for many students.  This book offers original, pedagogically sound, classroom-tested activities that engage students and inspire teachers.  Each chapter contains classroom exercises that are practical and easily implemented, and help students learn core principles in ways that are fun and engaging.  Chapters illustrate basic concepts like variance and standard deviation, correlation, p-values and effect sizes, as well as teaching strategies for identifying confounding factors, recognizing bias, constructing surveys, and understanding the ethics of behavioral research.

 

CBT

Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy

SECOND EDITION

Michelle G. Craske

In this revised edition of Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy, Michelle G. Craske provides vital updated coverage of the literature that explores the theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, and empirical basis of the approach, as well as likely future developments. This essential primer to cognitive behavioral therapy, amply illustrated with case examples featuring diverse clients, is perfect for graduate students studying theories of therapy and counseling as well as for seasoned practitioners interested in better understanding this approach.

 

 

psych of juries

The Psychology of Juries

Edited by Margaret Bull Kovera

This volume summarizes what is known about the psychology of juries and makes a strong call to arms for more research. Esteemed jury scholars identify important, yet understudied, topics at the intersection of psychology and law, review what research is currently available on the topics, and then suggest new research questions that would advance the field. Furthermore, the authors evaluate the relative importance of research methods that emphasize generalizability versus tight experimental control. Collectively, the chapters present a comprehensive survey of the literature on jury behavior and decision making and offer a robust agenda to keep researchers busy in years to come.

 

Pratyusha Tummala-Narra: On Psychoanalysis & Cultural Competence

This is the latest in a series of interviews with APA Books authors. For this interview, Andrew Gifford, Developmental Editor at APA Books, spoke with Pratyusha Tummala-Narra, professor of psychology at Boston College. Her book Psychoanalytic Theory and Cultural Competence in Psychotherapy won Honorable Mention at the 2017 PROSE Awards

Note: The opinions expressed in this interview are those of the authors and should not be taken to represent the official views or policies of the American Psychological Association.

usha tummala-narra photo

Pratyusha (Usha) Tummala-Narra received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Michigan State University. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Counseling, Developmental and Educational Psychology at Boston College; a Teaching Associate in Psychiatry at the Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School; and in Independent Practice in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her research interests focus on the intersections of culture, race, gender, immigration, and trauma, and culturally informed psychotherapy practice. Her clinical scholarship has focused on psychoanalytic perspectives on the relationship between sociocultural context and identity and its influence on the therapeutic process.

AG: Congratulations on winning a PROSE Award!  Tell us a little bit about your inspiration for writing this title, and what you hope the book will achieve.

PT-N: Thank you! The book is a culmination of my clinical experience and research over the course of twenty years. I have worked with clients in psychotherapy who have taught me a great deal about the complexity of sociocultural context in their lives. They are the inspiration for me writing this book. Over the years, I had the opportunity to learn from mentors and scholars from psychoanalytic, multicultural, and feminist perspectives, all of which have influenced my understanding of cultural competence in practice. My hope in writing the book was to expand the ways in which cultural competence has been discussed in psychology. In particular, I wanted to bring to the foreground psychoanalytic concepts that are especially helpful in examining and addressing the depth of how sociocultural realities shape people’s experiences of themselves and their relationships, and conflict and distress. I hope that the book draws attention to an understanding of sociocultural issues in psychotherapy that underscores both the realities of context and the individual’s experience of this context as dynamic, fluid, and powerful.

AG: In 2012, in an article written for the Division 39 newsletter, you pointed out the “absence of dialogue” about race and called for psychoanalysts to offer insight into this neglected discussion. What role do you see for psychoanalytic theory in helping generate this dialogue?

PT-N: There is indeed an absence of constructive dialogue on race in psychology and in broader society. Race, unlike some other aspects of social context, evokes anxiety and grief for people of all racial backgrounds. Psychoanalytic theory can help us understand why it is so difficult for us to engage in honest dialogue about race, especially with people whom we perceive as racially and/or culturally different from us. A major area of interest within psychoanalytic theory concerns trauma and traumatic stress. The challenges we face in discussing race in the United

States at least in part stem from the fact that race and racism are traumatic both in the past and in the present, and much of how racism operates lies in the unconscious. Even when we perceive ourselves to be open-minded, we are socialized with messages regarding race from an early age, which then impact the ways we perceive our own social locations and those of others. Psychoanalytic theory helps us to recognize that we all have biases, stereotypes, and prejudice that lie outside of our conscious awareness, and that we struggle to hold tension with regard to our privilege and our marginalization. The theory can also help us begin to have more authentic dialogue about race through an understanding of individual and collective defenses, such as denial and projection, which serve to protect us from anxiety produced from talking about race and racism. Psychoanalytic theory also suggests that such dialogue requires witnessing and mourning the loss and trauma incurred through racism, which means that as a profession, we need to create spaces where people with different experiences with race can engage with each other by listening attentively to each other. Interestingly, although it is assumed that psychologists are good listeners, we sometimes are limited in the ways that we listen when we become defensive despite our good intentions. Psychoanalytic theory helps us to think more about our own role as listeners in the context of race.

AG: Psychoanalysis has become old-fashioned in many people’s eyes, perhaps due in part to its origins within the European, doctor-patient tradition.  What does psychoanalysis offer—both generally and for multicultural populations specifically —that other, younger approaches do not?    

Psychoanalysis does have a history of neglecting issues of sociocultural context. However, over the past twenty years, psychoanalytic scholars have moved away from an understanding of intrapsychic life as unaffected by sociocultural context. Increasingly, psychoanalytic psychologists and psychoanalysts have been concerned with how sociocultural issues and social oppression influence people’s intrapsychic and relational life. These scholars are also interested in how early experiences within one’s family and community can shape later experiences with their social contexts and relationships with others. Contemporary psychoanalytic perspectives assume that there is a bidirectional influence between the context and the individual. For example, two people of the same ethnicity may have different feelings about a similar cultural context, even though they may also have some shared experiences. Psychoanalysis offers an important lens into why people experience a particular aspect of diversity in certain ways by considering the influence of unique life experiences and unconscious processes associated with these experiences. These developments within psychoanalysis have a great deal to offer our understanding of cultural competence in psychotherapy. It is important that psychologists consider that cultural competence involves a process of understanding various dimensions of a person’s life, including his/her unconscious life (e.g., wishes, conflicts, defenses, fantasies, dreams), as they have tremendous impact on how he/she experiences the self and others and how he/she responds to stress and conflict.

AG: What advice do you have for psychology students today who are interested in pursuing psychoanalytic training?   

My hope is that psychology students are open and excited to learn about psychoanalytic theory and its contributions to understandings of cultural competence in psychotherapy. Unfortunately, in many training programs in psychology, students are not exposed to psychoanalytic theory. I encourage students to advocate for more exposure to psychoanalytic ideas in their training. Students are typically working with clients who are coping with multiple forms of stress, often situated within systemic oppression (e.g., poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism). The opportunity to learn about how clients experience and cope with oppression both intrapsychically and interpersonally would benefit students as they develop formulations and techniques to engage effectively with their clients. The dynamics of issues of diversity are also evident in students’ relationships with their supervisors and faculty, and psychoanalytic theory can offer a lens into understanding impasses that may occur in these relationships as well.

Congratulations!

If there’s one question psychologists are always asking, it’s:

When will I be invited to the Academy Awards?

starsFor Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Distinguished Faculty Fellow in the Psychology Department at Temple University, the answer was: this year!  Her son Benj Pasek was nominated for Best Original Song, for La La Land’s “City of Stars.”  And when he won the Oscar, he thanked his mother—who was there in the audience—in a very moving speech.

hirsch-pasekDr. Hirsh-Pasek’s research examines the development of early language and literacy, as well as the role of play in learning. With her long-term collaborator, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, she recently published Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children.

To read an interview with Drs. Golinkoff and Hirsh-Pasek about their book, click here.

Congratulations, Benj, and to Kathy!

 

 

Women’s Day: Be Bold for Change

International Women’s Day is March 8, and the theme of this year’s holiday is “Be Bold for Change.” The campaign challenges us to help forge a more inclusive, gender-equal world. In particular, it calls on people everywhere to help women and girls achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious bias, promote gender-balanced leadership, value women and men’s contributions equally, and create flexible inclusive cultures. womens-day-2110797_1920

Although feminism and the psychology of women began with an emphasis on White, middle-class women, they have become much broader in recent years. Increasingly, scholarly work in this area focuses on the intersection of women’s multiple social identities, including race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, nationality, socioeconomic status, religion, ability, and age.

APA Books’ Psychology of Women series is designed to support and disseminate feminist scholarship that can improve the lives of women and other disempowered groups. The series explicitly seeks to promote a more diverse feminism.

A recent volume in the series, Womanist and Mujerista Psychologies: Voices of Fire, Acts of Courage, edited by Thema Bryant-Davis and Lillian Comas-Díaz, introduces the psychologies of womanists and mujeristas—African American women and Latinas, respectively, who have a broad and inclusive approach to feminism and liberation. Although the two psychologies differ (most notably in their racial and ethnic roots and histories of activism), they share an emphasis on spirituality and connection, creativity, self-definition, resiliency, and the liberation of all oppressed peoples. The book explores the thoughts, feelings, behavior, learning, and development of African American and Latina women and girls, the risks and traumas they frequently experience, as well as the unique cultural strengths that can help promote fulfillment and empowerment.